Detox footbaths

Every couple of days I have a foot bath to help relax the muscles in my feet and detoxify my body.

I fill a small tub up with just enough warm-hot water to cover my feet and then add a handful of one of the following ingredients:

  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Bicarb soda
  • Dead sea salt
  • Epsom salt
  • Seaweed

Sometimes I’ll add couple of drops essential oils.

I’ll sit and try to meditate for about 20 to 30 minutes so it’s my relaxation time. The hot water and salts combination works to leach toxins from your system.

Hands down, or should I say feet down, my favourite is the Epsom salts baths. It’s an easy way to give your body a boost in magnesium.

The Epsom Salt Council lists the following health benefits from the proper magnesium and sulfate levels:

  • Improved heart and circulatory health, reducing irregular heartbeats, preventing hardening of the arteries, reducing blood clots and lowering blood pressure.
  • Improved ability for the body to use insulin, reducing the incidence or severity of diabetes.
  • Flushed toxins and heavy metals from the cells, easing muscle pain and helping the body to eliminate harmful substances.
  • Improved nerve function by electrolyte regulation. Also, calcium is the main conductor for electrical current in the body, and magnesium is necessary to maintain proper calcium levels in the blood.
  • Relieved stress. Excess adrenaline and stress are believed to drain magnesium, a natural stress reliever, from the body. Magnesium is necessary for the body to bind adequate amounts of serotonin, a mood-elevating chemical within the brain that creates a feeling of well being and relaxation.
  • Reduced inflammation to relieve pain and muscle cramps.
  • Improved oxygen use.
  • Improved absorption of nutrients.
  • Improved formation of joint proteins, brain tissue and mucin proteins.
  • Prevention or easing of migraine headaches.

I will warn you – the seaweed one leaves your feet with a green tinge!

How to get rid of mould

gloves

We had some persistent mould in our house, and finally got a professional to have a look at it. We received the following advice on using vinegar:

Vinegar

1. Vacuum the area with a HEPA filter vacuum cleaner, using the small brush.

2. Wash the area using a mixture of 80% Anchor white vinegar and 20% water. Use three buckets, two filled with clean water to rinse your cloth in-between.

The off the shelf products on the market contain mostly bleach, so it will appear as if the mould is gone, but the spores may still be present. Try not to wipe in big strokes – otherwise you’ll just spread the spores. It’s best to use a micro-fibre cloth over a board and do a small area at a time.

Clove oil

Tracey Stranger says:

“Cloves are naturally potent as antifungal, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antioxidant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and analgesic….

To kill mould, first you need to dilute (12 drops per 100ml) the pure essential clove oil in filtered or purified water then put it into a spray bottle. Spray the surface and then leave for 20 minutes. Wipe the surface clean and re-spray and leave it as it will take 24-48 hours for the mould spores to die.”

Prevention

Once you have cleaned the area, you need to keep it dry to prevent the mould from reoccurring. Annie Clark recommends closing all windows and doors when it rains to stop moisture entering your house. A dehumidifier can help take moisture out of the air. You can also use products which absorbs water in your cupboards and wardrobes, such as  Cli~mate Dry Egg or Indicating Silica Gel packets.

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