Harvest exhibition at GOMA

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Yesterday I went to the opening of ‘Harvest’, an exhibition and film program exploring food as a subject for contemporary art. It being held at Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) from 28 June to 21 September 2014.

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With over 150 works from the Gallery’s Collection, ‘Harvest’ includes magnificent still lifes from the seventeenth century to today, contemporary photography, bold video works, and dramatic large-scale installations, with major new acquisitions of works by Argentine artist Tomás Saraceno.

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My favourite pieces were art work by Wei Wei (two above), and this still life.

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Afterwards I enjoyed a delicious cheese platter at GOMA Cafe Bistro.

The best bit about this exhibition is that it’s free.

Harvest at the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA)
Follow @qagoma with #Harvest

Carseldine Markets

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Carseldine Markets are located on the old QUT Carseldine Campus in Brisbane and are open Every Saturday from 6am to 12 noon.

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I had a pleasant visit and enjoyed a filling breakfast of pulled pork and then a delicious super healthy green smoothie. There is a gourmet food and dining are where you can pick up breakfast or brunch.

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The Carseldine Farmers and Artisan Markets is North Brisbane’s very own genuine produce, foodie and craft market with over 150 stalls. It features a wide range of wares focusing on premium and in-season fresh produce from South East Queensland.

You can find traditional and gourmet foods, market provisions made by passionate producers, growers, farmers, painters, cooks, chefs, designers, bakers, fishmongers, butchers, baristas, and juicers.

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There is also live music, activities for the kids, and a huge seating area.

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Recommended for those who live locally.

Carseldine Markets
532 Beams Rd (Cnr Beams & Dorville Rd)
Carseldine, Brisbane

List of cooking schools in Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast

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Here’s a list of all the cooking schools in Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast in Queensland:

Brisbane

Sunshine Coast

Best plants for Brisbane’s weather

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I attended a seminar on vegetable gardens presented by Tim Auld. He encouraged the group to brainstrorm the best plants for each of the seasons in Brisbane.

He explained that the traditional seasonal climates (spring, summer, autumn and winter) are mostly applicable to southern states of Australia. Queensland has a more temperate climate (sub-tropic) and further north have a tropical wet season (Dec – March).

Here’s the list of plants the group came up with:

Plants for the wet season (December to March):

  • ceylon spinach, choko, kang kong, melons, squash,  snake beans, sweet potato, taro and yams

Plants for a Cool temperate summer (April to August):

  • broccoli, carrot, garlic, lettuce, onions, peas, potatoes, radish, silverbeet, spinach, and tomatoes

Plants for a Mediterranean summer (September to November):

  •  basil, beans, beetroot, capsicum, chilli, corn, melons, silverbeet, and squash

Top ten food experiences to have in Brisbane

After much debate with my husband, we have come up with this list of our top ten food experiences to have in Brisbane:

  1. Award winning Very chocolate gelato from Sugo Mi Gelateria.
  2. Fat Pho Noodles at Fat Noodle
  3. Sustainable fish and chips from Swampdog.
  4. Coffee at Cup Cafe
  5. Authentic Italian wood-fired pizza from Vespa Pizza
  6. Romantic dinner for two at Montrachet
  7. A slice of cake from the Welsh Lady
  8. Three course celebration lunch at Aria Restaurant
  9. A takeaway wrap from Cafe Wrapture
    mayfield-chocolates
  10. A selection of chocolates from Mayfield Chocolates

What are your favourite eating experiences in Brisbane? 

Costa talks a whole lot of rubbish at The Queensland Garden Expo

Costa, Emma

The highlight of The Queensland Garden Expo was meeting Costa Georgiadis, host of ABC’s Gardening Australia. We were lucky enough to have front row seats while we listed to him talk about “What a load of rubbish Resources. Why compost, creativity and collaboration is the health insurance we all need to subscribe to”.

Costa showed us photos of a garbage audit he had done at primary school and explained to the kids (and the audience) the importance of recycling our waste. He urged us to change our perspective on rubbish, and start to call it waste, and also to start to think about it as a resource. More than half of our waste is food, which can be converted into compost and then it can be used as an input into improving our soil. The compost feeds the plants which in turn feed us. “If we look after our soil, it will look after us”, he said.

Costa then showed us the following video:

Plastic State of Mind (Empire State of Mind Parody)

We enjoyed our time visiting all the stalls and buying some heritage seeds at The Queensland Garden Expo. You’d be spoilt for choice if you were wanting to buy seeds, plants and gardening products.

Plastic Free July

Did you know it was plastic free July? What will you do this month to creatively convert your rubbish into a resource?

Let’s Fight for the reef

I volunteer for the Australian Marine Conservation Society who in partnership with WWF are currently involved in promoting awareness in their Fight for the Reef campaign.

The Queensland Government is fast-tracking mega port developments, dredging and dumping of millions of tonnes of seabed and rock, and encouraging a shipping superhighway.

The Australian Government is approving these developments, including the world’s biggest coal port at Abbot Point, 50 km from the Whitsunday Islands.

Fight for the Reef is working with the Australian community to protect the Reef and the $6 billion tourism industry and 60,000 jobs it supports.

It’s your Reef, but you’re going to have to fight for it.
Fight for the Reef

The Great Barrier Reef in Queensland is on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Posted for National Volunteer Week.

Brisbane Times Good Food Guide Queensland 2012

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I was excited to get my hands on the very first edition of the Brisbane Times Queensland Good Food Guide.

With more than 450 reviews of eateries in Brisbane and covering the top of Queensland right down to Northern New South Wales.

Each review includes price range, opening hours and a score.

The 208 page full colour book is edited by Queensland food writer Natascha Mirosch. She has dispatched more than 25 reviewers all over Brisbane and up to Port Douglas and down to Coolangatta to seek the best places to dine in Queensland. Find out which dining establishments were dished up a coveted Good Food Guide Award chef hat.

The book is available in newsagents and book stores for $24.95.

An online version of the book is available, with access to all of the reviews. For a limited time the website only subscription for Brisbane Times Good Food Guide is only $4.50!!!

This is a Rocketman Media sponsored post.

Fruit trees for Brisbane backyards

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I’ve decided to expand our selection of fruit trees in our permaculture garden. I realised that I didn’t own any useful gardening books on fruit trees, particularly ones that would help me decide which fruit trees are suitable for Brisbane’s climate and are less than 5 metres so that I can cram lots in and have lots of variety.

I ended up posting to the Brisbane Local Food ning and got a great response. I love the way online forums facilitate answers that are better than what I would have come up from reading a book. Thanks to everyone who helped me compile this list:

  • acerola cherry
  • apples, dwarf sub-tropical (Golden Dorsett , Tropical Anna, Tropical Sweet)
  • avocado, dwarf
  • banana
  • barbados cherry
  • blueberries (Sharp Blue – self-pollinating and low chill)
  • calamondin
  • crab apple
  • custard apple
  • dragon fruit
  • fig
  • grapes
  • grumichama
  • guava
  • jaboticaba
  • lemon
  • lime
  • longan (protected from birds and possums)
  • lychee
  • macadamia (pot)
  • mandarin, dwarf (freemont)
  • mango, dwarf
  • mulberry, dwarf (red shatoot)
  • native raspberry (scrambling bush)
  • nectarine (low chill)
  • orange – washington; Lanes late; Valencia and red ruby;
  • pawpaw
  • pepino
  • persimmon (but you’d need to prune it to under 5m)
  • pomegranate
  • plumcote
  • pomelo
  • sea grape tree
  • soursop
  • tamarillos
  • thai apple

I’d love to hear if you are successfully growing any other fruit trees in the Brisbane area?

If you live outside of Brisbane, you may like the list of trees for a suburban food forest.

Getting started growing Bananas in Queensland

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Unfortunately due to an overwhelming demand since Cyclone Yasi, there is a six month waiting list for banana plants! So I’m going to have to put my banana growing plans on hold. Here’s some of the information I discovered while conducting research.

Bananas require full sunlight for most of the day. They do best is a sheltered area where the roots will not become flooded. The best time to plant is from September to mid-December.

They require a large amount of plant nutrients to grow and fruit. (800 grams of lime, 240 gram of urea, 30 grams of super

Residential growers in south Queensland require a permit to grow a maximum of 10 plants. Permits are free of charge and made to Biosecurity (currently part of the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries).

The only permitted varieties are:

  • Blue Java – Silvery wax bloom, white flesh, dessert and cooking
  • Bluggoe (plantain or cooking banana) – angular fruit
  • Kluai Namwa Khom (Dwarf Ducasse) – fragrant sweet flavour, dessert and cooking, very vigorous. Referred to as sugar banana.
  • Goldfinger – tangy tasting, doesn’t turn brown when cut
  • Ladyfinger – drought hardy, long shelf life, dessert type, sweet creamy flesh
  • Pissang Ceylan -pinkish midribs on leaves, agreeably sweet acid

There is currently only ONE supplier in Queensland – Blue Sky Backyard Bananas – each plant costs $30 each including postage.

Further information

Agrilink produce a Tropical banana information kit as a series of PDFs. The kit provides information on all aspects of growing tropical bananas in Queensland.

Jerry Coleby-Williams has written a Fact Sheet: Growing Bananas for the ABC Gardening website.