Carseldine Markets

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Carseldine Markets are located on the old QUT Carseldine Campus in Brisbane and are open Every Saturday from 6am to 12 noon.

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I had a pleasant visit and enjoyed a filling breakfast of pulled pork and then a delicious super healthy green smoothie. There is a gourmet food and dining are where you can pick up breakfast or brunch.

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The Carseldine Farmers and Artisan Markets is North Brisbane’s very own genuine produce, foodie and craft market with over 150 stalls. It features a wide range of wares focusing on premium and in-season fresh produce from South East Queensland.

You can find traditional and gourmet foods, market provisions made by passionate producers, growers, farmers, painters, cooks, chefs, designers, bakers, fishmongers, butchers, baristas, and juicers.

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There is also live music, activities for the kids, and a huge seating area.

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Recommended for those who live locally.

Carseldine Markets
532 Beams Rd (Cnr Beams & Dorville Rd)
Carseldine, Brisbane

List of cooking schools in Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast

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Here’s a list of all the cooking schools in Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast in Queensland:

Brisbane

Sunshine Coast

Best plants for Brisbane’s weather

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I attended a seminar on vegetable gardens presented by Tim Auld. He encouraged the group to brainstrorm the best plants for each of the seasons in Brisbane.

He explained that the traditional seasonal climates (spring, summer, autumn and winter) are mostly applicable to southern states of Australia. Queensland has a more temperate climate (sub-tropic) and further north have a tropical wet season (Dec – March).

Here’s the list of plants the group came up with:

Plants for the wet season (December to March):

  • ceylon spinach, choko, kang kong, melons, squash,  snake beans, sweet potato, taro and yams

Plants for a Cool temperate summer (April to August):

  • broccoli, carrot, garlic, lettuce, onions, peas, potatoes, radish, silverbeet, spinach, and tomatoes

Plants for a Mediterranean summer (September to November):

  •  basil, beans, beetroot, capsicum, chilli, corn, melons, silverbeet, and squash

Top ten food experiences to have in Brisbane

After much debate with my husband, we have come up with this list of our top ten food experiences to have in Brisbane:

  1. Award winning Very chocolate gelato from Sugo Mi Gelateria.
  2. Fat Pho Noodles at Fat Noodle
  3. Sustainable fish and chips from Swampdog.
  4. Coffee at Cup Cafe
  5. Authentic Italian wood-fired pizza from Vespa Pizza
  6. Romantic dinner for two at Montrachet
  7. A slice of cake from the Welsh Lady
  8. Three course celebration lunch at Aria Restaurant
  9. A takeaway wrap from Cafe Wrapture
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  10. A selection of chocolates from Mayfield Chocolates

What are your favourite eating experiences in Brisbane? 

The Essential List of Fruit Trees for Brisbane Backyards

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I decided to expand our selection of fruit trees in our backyard. Unfortunately, I didn’t own any useful gardening books on fruit trees, particularly ones that would help me decide which fruit trees are suitable for Brisbane’s climate and are less than 5 metres so that I can cram in a ton of different trees.

Fruit trees for Brisbane

Here’s my mega list of fruit trees suitable for Brisbane:

  • acerola cherry
  • apples, dwarf sub-tropical (Golden Dorsett , Tropical Anna, Tropical Sweet)
  • avocado, dwarf
  • banana
  • barbados cherry
  • blueberries (Sharp Blue – self-pollinating and low chill)
  • calamondin
  • crab apple
  • custard apple
  • dragon fruit
  • fig
  • grapes
  • grumichama
  • guava
  • jaboticaba
  • lemon
  • lime
  • longan (protected from birds and possums)
  • lychee
  • macadamia (pot)
  • mandarin, dwarf (freemont)
  • mango, dwarf
  • mulberry, dwarf (red shatoot)
  • native raspberry (scrambling bush)
  • nectarine (low chill)
  • orange – washington; Lanes late; Valencia and red ruby;
  • pawpaw
  • pepino
  • persimmon (but you’d need to prune it to under 5m)
  • pomegranate
  • plumcote
  • pomelo
  • sea grape tree
  • soursop
  • tamarillos
  • thai apple

Thank you to the knowledgeable people on the Brisbane Local Food ning who helped to compile this great list of small Brisbane suitable fruit trees.

I’d love to hear if you are successfully growing any other fruit trees in the Brisbane area?

If you live outside of Brisbane, you may like the list of trees for a suburban food forest.

Getting started growing Bananas in Queensland

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Here is some of the information I discovered while researching how to go about growing bananas in your backyard for Brisbane and Queensland.

Bananas require full sunlight for most of the day. They do best is a sheltered area where the roots will not become flooded. The best time to plant them is from September to mid-December.

Bananas require generous amounts of plant nutrients to grow and fruit. (800 grams of lime, 240 gram of urea, 30 grams of super)

Residential growers in south Queensland require a permit to grow a maximum of 10 plants. Permits are free of charge and made to Biosecurity (currently part of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries).

Permitted Bananas in Queensland

The only permitted varieties of bananas are:

  • Blue Java – Silvery wax bloom, white flesh, dessert and cooking
  • Bluggoe (plantain or cooking banana) – angular fruit
  • Kluai Namwa Khom (Dwarf Ducasse) – fragrant sweet flavour, dessert and cooking, very vigorous. Referred to as sugar banana.
  • Goldfinger – tangy tasting, doesn’t turn brown when cut
  • Ladyfinger – drought hardy, long shelf life, dessert type, sweet creamy flesh
  • Pissang Ceylan -pinkish midribs on leaves, agreeably sweet acid

There is currently ONE supplier in Queensland – Blue Sky Backyard Bananas – each plant costs from $25 including postage and handling.

Further Information

Agrilink have developed a Tropical banana information kit as a series of PDFs. The kit provides information on all aspects of growing tropical bananas in Queensland.

Jerry Coleby-Williams has written a great Fact Sheet: Growing Bananas for the ABC Gardening website.

Raspberries in Brisbane

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I bought a new raspberry plant this weekend from the Ferny Grove markets. I sent the last one up to Toowoomba where I hope the frost will help it fruit better, as I was having no luck with it.

The advice I got from the grower was that raspberries in Brisbane need to be the non-frosting kind. I bought a Bogong, but he was also selling Autumn Bliss. He said you can grow your raspberries on a trellis, and pinch out the tips if you want to grow it as an espalier.

We did get some fruit on our native raspberry but not enough to make a meal of them. You can buy them from Northey Street.

I ♥ Brisbane Food Bloggers

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Here are some of the Brisbane based food bloggers:

Sorry no more updates to the list. You are more than welcome to leave a comment with your details.

Native plants for butterflies

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To encourage butterflies to your garden you’ll need to provide both plants for the caterpillars and a good range of nectar rich flowers throughout the year for the butterflies. A source of water is also required – a bird bath is ideal. Local native plants from your region are the best choice.

Here are some that a suitable for the greater Brisbane area:

Ground covers and herbs:

  • Love flower
  • Spade flower
  • Stinging nettle
  • Yellow buttons

Native grasses:

  • Kangaroo Grass
  • Lomandra
  • Pademilon Grasses (Oplismenus)

Shrubs:

  • Bolwarra
  • Brisbane Wattle
  • Coffee Bush
  • Dogwood
  • Forest hop Bush
  • Green Wattle
  • Native Finger Lime
  • Native Plum
  • Pavetta

Trees:

  • Brown Kurrajong
  • Brush Box
  • Crown of Gold Tree
  • Lacebark Tree
  • Macadamia
  • Melaleuca and Callistemon
  • Rusty Gum
  • Sandpaper figs
  • Tuckeroo

Vines and Palms:

  • Barbed Wire Vine
  • Monkey Rope
  • Native Wisteria
  • Piccabeen Palm
  • Richmond Birdwing Vine

Where to buy local native plants around Brisbane

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There are a number of great little places where you can buy local native plants in and around Brisbane. The top four are my favourite places for variety and price:

Northey Street City Farm

Corner of Northey and Victoria Streets,
Windsor QLD
Phone: (07) 3857 8775

Pine Rivers Community Nursery – Kumbartcho Sanctuary
Bunya Pine Court, Eatons Hill
Phone: (07) 3264 3953

Fairhill Native Plants and Botanic Gardens
114-132 Fairhill Road,
Ninderry (Yandina) QLD 4561
Phone: (07) 5446 7088

Nova Gardens Nursery
78a Settlement Road, The Gap, QLD
Phone: (07)  3300 4161

Morton Bay community plant nurseries:

Bribie Island Community Nursery
208 First Avenue, Bongaree
Phone: (07) 3410 0088

Caboolture Region Environmental Education Centre (CREEC)
150 Rowley Road, Burpengary
Phone: (07) 3888 9285

Redcliffe Botanic Gardens
Henzell Street, Redcliffe