Directory of Paleo and Primal Food in Australia

meatcart-yellow-bag

Here’s a list of paleo and primal food in Australia. Please leave a comment if you have anything to add. Thanks for all the contributions over at Mark’s Daily Apple.

World wide

Australia wide

  • Organic dates: Coles but not Woolworths
  • Coconut milk and cream with no additives/emulsifiers etc: Ayam-brand coconut milk in the Asian section. There is also an organic line. – Woolworths.
  • Organic shredded coconut, Macro-brand: Woolworths
  • Macro almond butter – Woolworths
  • Grass fed meat – Aldi
  • Lindt 85% chocolate, Green and Blacks 85% chocolate – Woolworths, Coles, IGA
  • Chocolate, coconut sugar etc – Loving Earth
  • Free range chicken – Coles and Woolworths
  • 180 nutrition protein powder
  • Paleo Hero – muesli, bars and supplements
  • Paleo Café – various locations
  • Coconut yoghurt: Coyo
  • Grass fed butter – Mainland Butter and Anchor butter and Westgold
  • beef jerky – Geronimo Jerky
  • Organic coconut oil – http://www.aclarahealth.com.au/products.htm
  • Nuilife coconut oil
  • Spiral Foods coconut oil
  • Various – Honest to Goodness

Adelaide and South Australia

  • Meat – organic/grass-fed etc: P&O organic butchers, located in the city in the David Jones basement in Food Glorious Food, and also on Magill Road. The Magill Road one is far more useful if you are looking for the more ‘uncommon’ parts of meat.
  • Coconut Oil – available in several places in and around the Central Market, but for the best value/selection I go to Goodies and Grains in the Central Markets (Gouger St side).
  • Coconut Flour – order it through the health food store in Burnside Village.
  • Spices/nuts/dutch pressed cocoa/agave nectar – Goodies and Grains in Central Market

Brisbane and Queensland

  • Grass fed beef: Super Butchers have a wide selection of grass-fed beef.
  • Grass fed meat: Meatcart – Online butchers
  • Grass fed beef and lamb delivered throughout Queensland – Mitchell Grass Meats
  • Queensland Natural Beef at Toogoolawah have grass fed beef, lamb and pork
  • Gympie St Terrace Butchery is the place to go. You can even order nitrate free bacon before hand. It’s all grass fed and local meats.
  • My Butcher in Duke St also stock some pretty darned nice beef
  • Eumundi has an organic butcher as well

Canberra and Australian Capital Territory

  • Coconut flour: Healthy life, Woden Westfield. IGA Deakin
  • Griffith shops has an organic butcher
  • Mountain Creek Whole Foods
  • Nut Shoppe at the Fyshwick markets good for coconut flour and oils and nuts

Melbourne and Victoria

  • Supplements and stock Wicked Whey (choc) and Naked Whey (unflavoured), which are good, clean, locally-made, grass-fed whey protein products – Great Earth
  • Kefir – Polish deli at Vic Market
  • Rendina’s Butchery in Balwyn sell a huge range of organic, bd and free range meats, including home made smallgoods (and are lovely people).
  • The Vic Market is great with loads of super fresh organic veggies, nuts and spices, and the Chicken Pantry in the shop section sells free range and some organic poultry and game. McIntosh’s sell organic coffee beans.
  • Cherry Tree Organics in Beaconsfield are butchers selling their own organic/bd lamb and beef as well as pork, chicken and smallgoods. They also have vegies and some fruit and order bath milk for anyone who likes to take milk baths. They also stock True Organic butter and cheeses.
  • I get coconut flour, flakes, and a couple of different brands of oil from Go Vita Berwick

Perth and Western Australia

  • Free range eggs – Wanneroo markets, local IGAs have Kalbarri eggs
  • Pork Crackle- there’s a local brand called Alan’s Pork Crackle, based in Maddington, you have to hunt down which local IGAs or Farmer Jacks stock them!
  • Spices, alternative flours, chia seeds etc – Wanneroo markets,
  • Coconut flour – Health Kick stores have Nui brand, can ask them to order it in
  • Coconut oil – Health Kick stores, and some Friendlies Chemists have them too!
  • Cocoa powder Green and Blacks- Health Kick stores
  • Grass Fed Beef at Subiaco’s farmers markets and frozen raw cows milk

Sydney and New South Wales

  • Grassfed beef: Hudson meats in Surry Hills is almost exclusively grassfed. Additionally, I just asked my local butcher, Michael’s Meats (very well priced, in the Surry Hills shopping village) whether his meat was grassfed and he said that almost all of it is. Additionally, Eveleigh Markets near Sydney Uni on a Saturday has a grassfed beef stall (Greenhill Organic meat).
  • grassfed beef, lamb and goat from farms in Bowral – Sydney Meats, Farm Fresh to your Door
  • Vanilla beans: Organic Vanilla Powder 30-90g – Professional Whey Protein Powder & Sports Supplements at Wholesale Prices
  • FivefingersThe Adventure Megastore – Home of Adventure in Sydney City. They are Australian priced though so cost way more than in the USA. Excellent customer service!
  • Kefir grains, coconut yoghurt and macadamia butter: About Life in Bondi junction, Sydney
  • Enoki mushrooms – paddy’s markets mushroom stand for $1.50 a bunch. Asian Thai-kee IGA above china town paddy’s markets has the same enoki for $1.90
  • Coconut/palm sugar: Thai kee IGA above paddy’s markets in Chinatown. They have all the dried seaweeds (and some fresh (frozen) too.
  • Grass fed beef etc– Slowly Does It http://slowlydoesit.com.au/
  • The Free Range Butcher, Sydney
  • the Grass Fed Butcher, Balmain markets
  • Nitrite free bacon: Sam the Butcher, Bondi Rd, Bondi.
  • Spaghetti squash: Norton St Grocer in Westfield, Bondi Junction
  • Real sauerkraut: the Russkis Deli on Bond Rd, Bondi
  • Adam’s Quality Meats in Gerringong, NSW has only grass-fed beef and lamb.

Tasmania

  • Kelty Farm – supply completely pasture fed beef. I buy mine from Eumurrah shop in Launceston.

In My Kitchen – August 2013

Thank you Celia from Fig Jam and Lime Cordial for allowing me to participate In My Kitchen August 2013. This month, in my kitchen are …

Loose Leaf Tea House

I tried three teas from The Loose Leaf Tea House, with English Breakfast being my firm favourite.

Herbies spices

Fragrant Sweet Spices by Herbie’s Spices. I have used 1/8 teaspoon in a mug of hot chocolate to give it a lovely warm spicy taste. You can also add 3 teaspoons to a cake mixture – I tried it with some gluten free chocolate brownies.

I recently interviewed Ian Hemphill from Herbie’s Spices.

Melinda's Red Velvet Cake

Melinda from Melinda’s Gluten Free Goodies allowed me to try some of her delicious products. My favourite was the gluten free Heavenly Chocolate Fudge Brownies. The Decadent Red Velvet Cake is the last one I have to try – but I’m saving it for a special occasion.

San Remo Spelt Pasta

We have been having San Remo spelt pasta and using spelt flour instead of wheat, as spelt is one of the more tolerant gluten grains. Both are easy substitutes and we have hardly noticed the difference.

JarKey

This nifty little device is called a JarKey and it helps lift off the lid of bottles and jars. It’s invaluable and every kitchen should have one, especially if you have arthritis in your hands or you do a lot of preserving.

We are giving away plenty of passionfruit to family and friends.

Posted for In My Kitchen August 2013 hosted by Celia from Fig Jam and Lime Cordial

How to use a worm tower

worm-tower

Since abandoning our worm farm a few years ago (the weather was too hot in Brisbane), we decided to try a worm tower. This one is by Birdies Garden Products. The beauty of this method is the temperature is lower as the soil acts as an insulator.

When you first set up the tower, you may like to add a handful of composting worms and some pre-soaked coconut coir as bedding material.

You use it just like a compost bin but you leave out the big bits. We have a container on our bench top where we place some of our fruit and vegetable scraps and this then gets emptied into the worm farm which has a removable lid. Don’t forget worms do not like onions or citrus so keep these things out and put them in your normal compost bin. You can also add leaves, grass clippings, material from your garden, paper, small pieces of cardboard, and hair.

We’ve had no problems with our worm farm, but if it is starting to smell add a handful of lime to neutralise the food scraps.

The tower itself sits in one of our raised vegetable beds and is slightly higher than the soil and edge of the bed. It’s just less than my hand wide with lots of holes at the bottom to allow the composting worms to move freely between the garden bed and the compost. Worm poo (what is left after the worms have digested the material) is a rich source of nutrients and an excellent fertiliser for your vegetable plants.

After the compost has decomposed enough you can top it up or move it to a new location in the vegetable bed to spread the nutrients around. We would recommend moving the worm tower every six months to a new spot. The benefit of placing it in the bed is that the plants are receiving nutrients right at the root zone.

Worm towers are an easy way to keep a worm farm in a hot or cold location.

Thank you to Birdies Garden Products for providing us with the worm tower.

Transition tip: Swap your disposable sanitary products

Transition tip: Swap your disposable sanitary products

Cloth menstrual pads are economical and environmentally friendly. They can be made with any absorbent material. I think unbleached cotton is  the best, but hemp or cotton fleece would also work.

There are plenty of printable patterns online to make a reusable pad at home.

Simply rinse the reusable pads in cold water and soak in a basin of cold water until you are ready to put them in the washing machine with any other load of washing. The soaking water can be used on your garden – it is a natural product after all!

And why not also try a reusable cup instead of a tampon:

Green and natural dogs

dash

When we brought home a cute dog from the RSPCA we didn’t know what we were in for! Dash’s two favourite activities are to dig holes in the dirt and chase lizards, which is not so great for our garden. Although, she does loves ripping up boxes and cardboard which we then put in the compost.

Dash was a stray so she was pretty boney when we got her, but now she has put on some weight and is the normal range. She eats very well and  is on a mostly raw diet from The Complete Pet Company. I’ve recently added in yoghurt for the probiotics and coconut oil.

We’ve tried a number of different dog training techniques, but found attending dog training classes with IntaDOGZ were just what we needed. I also liked the following books:

Other good places to buy dog stuff are:

Please do not use tennis balls with your dog, as the yellow fluffy surface is not good for their teeth and gums.

I’m hoping to buy a Doog dog walking belt for Christmas, since I’m getting a little tired of always finding dog bags or treat crumbs in my pockets!