Book Review: One Pot Favourites by Pete Evans

one-pot-favourites

I own a few of Pete Evan’s paleo cookbooks and I love them all. I was keen to see if his latest cookbook ‘One Pot Favourites’ lived up to my expectations.

The cookbook features one hundred meals to roast, braise and slow cook. You can adapt the recipes, but you may like to invest in a slow cooker or pressure cooker.

All of the recipes are paleo friendly, so they don’t contain dairy, legumes, grains or refined sugar.

tikka-masala

We tried the tikka masala recipe, but swapped the chicken for lamb. The instructions were easy to follow and dinner was delicious. We served it with steamed rice, but to keep it paleo you could use cauliflower rice.

There are chapters devoted to vegetables, seafood, poultry, pork, lamb, goat, game and beef. You’ll be tempted by recipes for creamy cauliflower and coconut curry, whole roasted salmon with lemon and herbs, congee, Jewish penicillin (chicken soup), duck vindaloo, and porchetta with crispy crackling. The recipes come from all around the world from Bali, Indonesia, Vietnam, Korea, Malaysia, France, Ethiopia, Peru, South Africa, Jamaica and the Middle East.

I’ve bookmarked a few recipes for dinner next week and I can’t wait to try another hearty meal from this cookbook.

Highly recommended.

One Pot Favourites by Pete Evans is available to purchase from Dymocks online or in one of their book stores.

Red pepper

Over a month later, finally our first capsicum turned red!

I planted in some bulbs for spring flowers. I’m hoping to see Tulip Silentia, Tulip Ile De France, mixed ranunculus and white rain lilies add some sparkle to our back patio. The bulbs were pushed into the home-grown compost that was littered with broken egg and peanut shells. I just hope we don’t end up with tomatoes instead!

We pulled up all of the tomato plants that were grown from seedlings from the local markets. Matt found them flavourless and unfortunately I have no idea what type they were, but we’ll stick to heirlooms from now on anyhow. The potato plants continue to grow upwards. They received a sugar cane mulch top up, as did all of the beds and pots. We harvested two lemons and several kumquats.

I added some seeds to a set of peat pots – herb robert, tomatillo, tomatoes (various) and broccoli.

If you missed ABC’s Australian Story last week about Dr Maarten Stapper and biological farming, you might want to watch ‘Back to Earth‘ online.

How to pot a tree

We repotted a number of fruit trees that I’d bought recently. I swapped their small seedling pots to big plastic pots so they could spread out their roots and grow. The basic steps I follow when repotting a fruit tree are as follows:

  1. Add a thick layer of sugar cane mulch or hay at the bottom to allow any excess water to drain out. You could use stones (although it’ll be heavy to lift) or broken Styrofoam.
  2. Add some homemade compost to half way. If you don’t have any compost ready use a middle of the range bag of organic fruit and vegetable mix. Be careful the cheaper bags of compost tend to be filled with stones and sticks.
  3. Mix in a handful of blood and bone, chicken manure, and a spoonful of trace elements. This is to ensure your plant has a good mix of different minerals so it will develop healthy fruit.
  4. Add a handful of water crystals (or cat litter) – If you have time pre-soak them in water and seaweed solutions (optional).
  5. Add the plant making sure it’s straight and back fill to the rim with more compost.
  6. Gently press the soil down and water well.
  7. Add some more sugar cane on top to act as a mulch.

I use the same basic method for repotting a native tree – leaving out the extra nutrients at step 3, and using a decent quality native soil mix in place of the compost. Although these days I have started planting out native seedlings straight into the ground. Natives can be touchy and do not like being transplanted.

An alternative to using a pot is a planter bag. These are lightweight bags made from tough plastic with handles. They are easy to move and allow good aeration.

Any other hints?

Trees for a suburban food forest

I haven’t mentioned that we have about 10 dwarf fruit trees in pots, that we purchased at various times in 2008.

To decide which ones to plant, I made a list of all the trees that were under 3-4metres high, could be grown in a pot and trimmed to size and/or available as a dwarf. I was surprised at the variety available. When purchasing trees also consider their suitability to your climate, water requirements and whether or not you like the fruit they produce. If you eat lots of apple (say), you may like to consider getting a few different varieties – one that fruits early, one middle and one late season.

Here’s a list of suitable trees for suburban backyards:

  • Acerola Cherry
  • Apple (d)
  • Atherton Raspberry
  • Australian Round Lime
  • Avocado (d)
  • Babaco
  • Bananas
  • Black sapote
  • Blackberry
  • Blueberry
  • Boysenberry
  • Calamondin
  • Cape Gooseberry
  • Casana
  • Cassava
  • Ceylon Hill Gooseberry
  • Cherry
  • Chilli
  • Chinese Water Chestnut
  • Choko (v)
  • Cocona
  • Coffee
  • Comfrey
  • Currant (Red or Black)
  • Davidson’s Plum (p)
  • Fig (d)
  • Finger lime
  • Ginger
  • Goji Berry
  • Gooseberry
  • Governer’s Plum
  • Grape (v)
  • Grapefruit (d)
  • Grumichama Cherry
  • Guava
  • Jaboticaba
  • Japanese raisin
  • Jelly Palm / Wine Palm
  • Jerusalem Artichoke
  • Kakadu Plum
  • Kei Apple
  • Keriberry
  • Kiwifruit (v)
  • Kumquat (d)
  • Lemon (d)
  • Lemonade (d)
  • Lillypilly
  • Lime (d)
  • Loganberry
  • Loquat (d)
  • Macadamia (d)
  • Madrono
  • Mandarin (d)
  • Mango (d)
  • Medlar
  • Midyim
  • Miracle Fruit
  • Monstera
  • Mulberry (d)
  • Naranjilla
  • Natal Plum
  • Olive (d)
  • Orange (d)
  • Passionfruit (v)
  • Paw paw
  • Peach (d)
  • Pepino
  • Persimmon (d)
  • Pineapple
  • Plum
  • Plumcott
  • Plummelo
  • Pomegranate (d)
  • Raspberry
  • Rhubarb
  • Sea Grape
  • Strawberry
  • Tamarillo
  • Tangelo
  • Taro
  • Tea
  • Ugni
  • Yacon
  • Youngberry

Legend: (d) – dwarf available; (v) – vine; (p) – pot.

These edible trees, vines and others may be available in Australia from:

Please let us know if you have any other recommendations.

Update – I have more recently compiled a list of fruit trees for Brisbane backyards.