Review: Natural Instinct facial products

 natural-instinct2

I have been using a couple of the Natural Instinct products for my face. They are an Australian made natural skin and hair care brand, which are formulated with botanically-derived ingredients, certified organic extracts and pure essential oils. There are no nasties in their products, so they are grey-water safe, and products are not tested on animals.

Daily mosituriser – sinks in nicely, and is not greasy like some. It smells of jojoba and rosehips, and contain B5.

Facial scrub – the right texture and is not too grainy. My face felt clean afterwards and it contains jojoba and walnut.

Foaming and cream cleanser – Both satisfying products. The foaming cleanser lathers to a light foam and is scented with lavender and rosehip. The cream cleanser is scented with jojoba and witch hazel.

Clarifying toner – left my face toned and finished. It smells citrusy and refreshing of rosewater, witch hazel and orange flower.

What I like about these products all the products are free of sulphates, petrochemicals, parabens, PEGs and mineral oils. There are also no artificial colours or fragrances.

Thank you Natural Instinct for allowing me to trial these products. 

Natural Instinct hand wash, body wash and shampoo review

Natural Instinct

We have been using a couple of the Natural Instinct products for awhile now. They are an Australian made natural skin and hair care brand, which are formulated with botanically-derived ingredients, certified organic extracts and pure essential oils. There are no nasties in their products, so they are grey-water safe, and products are not tested on animals.

Natural Instinct Hand Wash – is a firm favourite in our household. It lathers well and has an authentic lemon and lavender smell. Even better it also comes in a 1-litre refill bottle to save on packaging.

Natural Instinct Sensitive Soap Free Body Wash

This is another firm favourite. It cleans well and has no scent. You get a smudgy lather rather than big bubbles.

Natural Instinct Sensitive Shampoo

This one doesn’t lather as well as my regular shampoo because it is free of sulphates (SLS and SLES), so you’ll need to use a generous amount. This one is also scent free and ideal for use if you have dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis or allergies.

What I like about these products are the generous sized bottles they come in and the pump spouts for easy application. All the products are free of sulphates, petrochemicals, parabens, PEGs and mineral oils. There are also no artificial colours or fragrances.

Thank you, Natural Instinct for allowing me to trial these products. 

Do owls keep the possums away?

tawny-owl

We are fortunate enough not to have any possums. When our neighbours had their mango tree, the possums used to eat the mangoes and then the seeds would fall on our garage roof in the middle of the night. Sometimes we hear possums on our roof, but mostly they are just passing through.

My theory for not having any resident possums in our garden is based on a very large eucalyptus tree in the nature strip near us. I think that a bird of prey lives in the tree and these large birds are keeping the possums out of our garden.

Matt has seen an owl in our backyard near the bird bath. We have also seen a couple of tawny frog-mouths on a number of different occasions.

Scott Alexander King describes owls as “nocturnal birds of prey, made up of two distinct groups: the Typical Owls, of which there are about 122 species, and the Barn owls of which there are about 12 individuals species. While there are some anatomical differences between the two families, all Owls have nocturnal vision, silent flight and a carnivorous diet….. She is one of the few creatures that actually waits for the sun to come up before retiring for a well-earned rest. She literally welcomes the sun as it illuminates and warms the horizon each morning.”

At a recent gardening presentation, one of the attendants mentioned that if possums are eating the fruit and vegetables in your backyard garden then you could try putting up a plastic owl to keep them away. She added that if the silhouette didn’t work, then you could try placing a solar powered light behind the owl, which will shine on the owl during the night and it will keep your garden safe.

Hoot. Hoot. Hoot.

Animal Dreaming – by Scott Alexander King

How to make your own sunscreen video

I love this video on making your own natural sunscreen from coconut oil, beeswax and zinc oxide powder. If it’s good enough for a fair-skinned surfer, Zach Keenan, then it will be good enough for me in the beaming Australian sun.

It’s important to not cover your whole body in sunscreen as you need exposed skin to absorb vitamin D.

Pat Coleby reveals why she changed her farming methods

Pat Coleby reveals why she changed her farming methods to natural methods.

I love Pat Coleby’s books. Highly recommended.

Pat Coleby can be found over at Farming Secrets.

How to make your own dish washing detergent

lemon

Many conventional dish washing detergents contain phosphate, which causes blue-green algae blooms in waterways.

Here’s  a simple recipe to make your own dish washing detergent:

1/4 cup petroleum-free soap flakes
1/4 cup glycerin
1/2 teaspoon of eucalyptus oil
11/2 cups of hot water

Instead of the eucalyptus oil, you may like to add a few drops of lemon or grapefruit essential oil.

Other green dish washing detergent products to try are:

We also like to look for one which did not contain sodium laurel sulphate, as it kills the good bugs in your tummy!

Handy hint – Place a leftover lemon half in your dishwasher to keep your dishes smelling fresh and clean.

Note: If you are on the GAPS or SCD diet – it’s best not to use a dishwasher.

How to make your own stain remover

A solution of half vinegar, half water sprayed on stains half an hour before washing helps to remove grass, juice, mildew, coffee and tea.

Hairspray helps remove ink stains.

Other green stain remover products to try are:

  • Cinderella Stain Remover

 

How to make your own window cleaner

For a smear-free finish to clean windows make up the following solution in a spray container:

1 part white distilled vinegar or lemon juice to
4 parts water

You may like to add a few drops of lemon essential oils.

Spray on the glass and wipe away marks with a chamois or crumpled newspaper.

Getting started in Honey Bees

We were interested in keeping bees, so I decided to do a little research. We attended an “Introduction to Natural Beekeeping” course by Tim Auld from All You Can Eat Gardens. It was great to see a top bar bee hive in action.

Natural beekeeping is based on the principles:

  1. Interference in the natural lives of the bees is kept to a minimum
  2. Nothing is put into the hive that is known to be, or likely to be harmful either to the bees, to us or to the wider environment and nothing is taken out that the bees cannot afford to lose.
  3. The bees know what they are doing: our job  is to listen to them and provide the optimum conditions for their well-being.

He recommends the following books:

You will need the following equipment:

  • Hive
  • Smoker
  • Hive tool
  • Protective clothing
  • Extractors – expensive, but can be hired when you need the honey

Tim Auld sells top bar bee hives.

You can buy these altogether as a package to save some money. Suggested suppliers include:

In Queensland, you need to register your hive with the Department of Primary Industries. You are  only allowed 2 hives per 1000m2.

Books and resources

Devita and Wot Not – natural sunscreen reviews

After discovering some nasties in my sunscreen, I decided to see if what natural sunscreens were available. I bought a new one and then discovered that it contained nanoparticles. Something I’d never even heard of!

The Environmental Working Groups (EWG) says:

Mineral formulations incorporate zinc oxide or titanium dioxide in nano- and micro-sized particles that can be toxic if they penetrate the skin.

One of the most common ingredients of sunscreens is oxybenzone. It can trigger allergic reactions, is a potential hormone disruptor and penetrates the skin in relatively large amounts. This chemical should be particularly avoided with children.

So I turned to Ananda Mahony from Vitale Natural to ask for some suggestions, and she recommended these two natural and safe sunscreens:

 

Devita Solar Block 30+ Suncreen is 100% natural and provides full spectrum UVA/UVB sun protection utilizing pure zinc oxide, and is titanium dioxide free.

This one smells how I remember zinc sticks in high school. It’s a little thicker and heavier so if feels like it’s going to protect you from the sun.

It contains: Zinc oxide 19% INACTIVE INGREDIENTS: Aloe barbadensis (certified organic aloe vera gel), Water (purified), Camellia sinensis (Japanese green tea) leaf extract, Capric/caprylic triglycerides (derived from coconut oil), Glycerin (vegetable), Butyrospermum parkii (shea butter), Olea europaea (olive) oil, Lecithin phospholipid, Hyaluronic acid (vegan source), Simmondsia chinensis* (jojoba) seed oil, Squalane (olive), Panthenol (vitamin B5), Tocopherol (vitamin E), NaPCA, Rosa moschata (rose hips) oil, Centella asiatica (goto kola), Copper gluconate, Magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, Fucus vesiculosis (seaweed) extract, Allantoin, Sodium riboflavin phosphate, Chondrus crispus (Irish moss), Lavandula officinalis* (lavender) essential oil, Anthemis nobilis (chamomile) flower essential oil, Vitis vinifera* (grape) seed extract.

 

Wot Not SPF 30+ Sunscreen is free from titanium dioxide and made from 100% natural and organic ingredients.

It contains grapeseed oil, safflower oil, sesame oil, candellila wax, beeswax, carnauba wax, shea butter, gmo-free vitamin e, purified water, certified organic aloe vera*, silica, naticide (all natural preservative). Active: zinc oxide.

Better yet it’s Australian made and owned.

Wot Not is my favourite of the two. It smells nicer and has a good consistency so it’s not sticky and hard to put on. Both have very light mild fragrances and I’d forgot that I’d even put them on.

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