5 Things to Do in Germany with an Aussie Man

gernman-snag

With Germany through to the next round at UEFA Euro Cup and hot favourites to win the football tournament you might be tempted to find out more about this beautiful European place. Germany is an amazing multicultural country which is steeped in history. The people are reserved but welcoming. If you need to convince your boyfriend or husband to travel to Germany on your next holiday, I’d like to tell you about the five best things to do which will appeal to an Aussie man:

  1. If your man is anything like mine, his first priority will be to unwind from his flight with a beer. Book a brewery tour with one of the many well-known German companies depending on what type of beer he prefers. Some of my personal favourites are Erdinger – the world’s largest wheat beer brewery, Holsten in Hamburg which is known for its pale larger, or Löwenbräu in Munich – a popular choice at Oktoberfest. German beer is strictly regulated and brewed based on a traditional recipe and fermentation technique which leads to a distinct aroma and taste you are sure to enjoy.
  2. While in Germany your man may want to hire a German car he’s always wanted to drive, like the latest model Audi, BMW, Porsche or Mercedes-Benz and test it to the limits on the Autobahn. Here you’ll find no federally mandated speed limits. Before you leave Australia he can practice his driving skills on the latest Need for Speed or Gran Turismo video games which are based on real autobahn tracks.
  3. Print off some Google maps and take a self-guided walk along the remains of the Berlin Wall. This famous concrete structure has mostly been torn down, but the trail remains popular with walkers and cyclists. You’ll find information panels along the way to highlight each area. The best place to start is at Checkpoint Charlie which was designated as the single crossing point for the Allied forces. Then follow the trail to see the Schlesischer Busch Command Post. Make sure you stop at the East Side Gallery where you can see over 100 murals, graffiti artworks, slogans and tags. This is the ideal place to practice your selfies. Then find out about the gristly history of Niederkirchnerstrasse and finally end your trek at Berauerstrasse.
  4. You may like to take a guided tour around the Olympiastadion in Berlin, which was originally built for the 1936 summer Olympics. It is Germany’s largest stadium and regularly hosts international football matches and rock concerts. Learn about it’s amazing history through a multimedia guide of the stadium and park. Usain Bolt broke the 100m and 200m world records at this stadium. It was here that Jesse Owns won the long jump in the Olympics and was the first male African American athlete to gain a sponsorship deal (with Adidas).
  5. Germany has the second most decorated Michelin star restaurants in the world. You will fall in love the hearty and healthy food. The country is well known for their traditional sausages with a phenomenal 1,500 different types which contain only the best meat as allowed by law. Eat your way through wursts of all kinds, pork knuckles, dumplings, spätzle and potato frites. Don’t forget to finish your meal with a slice of authentic Black Forest cake soaked in kirsch.

I hope you find some inspiration from these tourist activities which are unique to Germany. These ideas may help to persuade your better half to book some tickets.

 

Transition tip: Deconstruct your consumption habits

This transition tip idea comes from Mark Boyle in his book called The Moneyless Man – a year of freeconomic living.

As part of living without money for a year, he got a notepad and listed every single thing he consumed

“I called this my ‘breaking-it-down’ list. To structure my thoughts, I categorised my list into food, energy, heating, transport, entertainment, lighting, communications, reading, art and so on. The list eventually took up half the notepad – and that was the list of someone who considers himself quite a moderate consumer….

“It became clear, after just a couple of pages, that most of the stuff would involve me having no more than one degree of separation from what I consumed; either I would make it myself or know the person who produced it.”

“My list-making enabled me to establish my basic level of subsistence, the things I really couldn’t do without, and my priorities for the rest.”

The Moneyless Man
– by Mark Boyle