Paleo Greek lemon chicken

paleo-greek-chicken

This paleo dish is a classic Greek-style recipe with flavours of lemon and garlic. Sprinkled with the herbs oregano and rosemary are optional, but oregano is a powerful anti-microbial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal. Serve with vegetables or a Paleo Greek salad.

juice of 1 lemon
1 chicken, cut into ten pieces or ten wings
4 cloves of garlic
lemon cut into four wedges
1 tsp oregano
2 sprigs of rosemary
handful of parsley, chopped

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees C.
  2. Place the chicken on a roasting tray and pour the lemon juice over the chicken. Then add the garlic cloves, lemon wedges, oregano and rosemary. Mix well together.
  3. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Roast for 40 minutes until the chicken has turned golden brown and the juices run clear.

Serves 4.

Lemon barley water recipe

lemon barley water

My parents have a glut of lemons at the moment and they gave us ‘as many as we wanted’ when we saw them last. I’m a big fan of lemon barley water as an ideal way to use up lemons. This recipe is an adaptation of the one off the back of the McKenzie’s Pearl Barley packet.

Three or four lemons make half a cup of lemon juice. I like to use brown sugar but it gives the drink a warm orange colour, so if you want a more traditional yellow use white sugar. It’s a refreshing drink either way. We feed the remaining pearl barley to our dog. Although McKenzie’s recommends:

Serve in a jug with lots of ice and fresh mint leaves. Could also be mixed with dry ginger ale for a refreshing alternative. Don’t throw away the cooked barley. Store in the fridge and for a nutritious and filling breakfast, warm through and top with yoghurt and fresh fruit pieces.

Lemon barley water

1/4 cup pearl barley
1/2 cup brown or white sugar
1/2 cup lemon juice
4 cups water

  1. Rinse the pearl barley well, cover with cold water and bring to the boil in a saucepan. Drain and then remove any discoloured grain.
  2. Place pearl barley back into a saucepan with 4 cups of water. Cook on a simmer for 1 hour.
  3. Strain the pearl barley. Add the lemon juice and sugar and stir until sugar has dissolved. 
  4. Chill in the refrigerator.

Makes 1 litre.

Book review: Sabrina’s juicy little book of citrus – by Sabrina Hahn

sabrina-citrus-book

No plants generate more gardening questions than citrus – and zesty gardening goddess Sabrina Hahn has got all the answers, including green and practical solutions to the most common problems. 

Bringing together lemons, limes, grapefruits, kumquats, oranges and much more, this little book is packed full of useful information on how to grow happy healthy citrus in your garden. 

Sabrina’s Juicy Little Book of Citrus is written by Sabrina Hahn, a media presenter on ABC’s gardening talk-back radio. The book features beautiful black and white line drawings which illustrate various points. As Sabrina says, it is “solid information and no photos”. It is the ideal size to fit in your handbag.

The citrus family is an enormous one and its members include sweet oranges, grapefruits, pomelos, bitter oranges,  kumquats, calamondins, mandarins, tangelos, lemons, limes and citrons.

The book covers propagation and care, twelve citrus varieties for the home gardener, and a section on troubleshooting.

I did discover that the risk of growing citrus from seed is that it can take anything from 6 to 30 years before you see any fruit. Perhaps there is hope for my fruit-less lemon tree yet.

I also learnt you need to fertilise citrus little-and-often and Sabrina recommends a half a handful of fertiliser every month from September to February in the first year.

Highly recommended for citrus lovers.

Sabrina’s Juicy Little Book of Citrus – by Sabrina Hahn

 

Luscious lemon sago recipe

lemon

After five attempts at making sago, I have finally found the answer. It still looks like frog’s eggs, but it’s a light and refreshing dessert.

Sago is sometimes sold as ‘seed tapioca’. The one  I used is made by McKenzie’s and they clarify the difference on the back of the packet:

A common alternative to Sago is Seed Tapioca. Sago and Tapioca are both starch extracts, sago from various southeast sago palms and tapioca is processed from the tubers of the cassava plant.

This explains my mixed results. Perhaps I should rename the recipe to Luscious Lemon Seed Tapioca? Naw, it doesn’t have the same ring to it.

You may like to try this recipe with limes instead. I like to eat lemon sago alone, but you can serve it with fresh or stewed fruit and cream or custard.

Luscious lemon sago recipe

1/2 cup of sago
2 cups of water
1 lemon, juiced
2 Tbsp honey
2 Tbsp golden syrup

  1. Wash the sago and soak for an hour in some water.
  2. Rinse off the water. Add 2 cups of water to a saucepan and bring to the boil.
  3. When boiling, add the sago and stir until quite transparent (this can take 15-30minutes).
  4. Add the lemon juice, golden syrup and sugar.
  5. Pour into a bowl or mould and chill.

Serves 4.

Passionfruit lemonade

Last year we took bags of passionfruit to work, because we weren’t really fussed on them. I like the taste, but can’t be bothered with the seeds. Passionfruit is very high in vitamin C, so this refreshing drink is slightly less naughty than the bottled stuff. Adjust the water, sugar and fruit ratio depending on whether you like tart or sweet lemonade. Perhaps I should call it passionade?

Passionfruit lemonade

1 cup of freshly squeezed lemon and passionfruit juice, strain the seeds
3 cups of water
½ cup of white sugar

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a jug.
  2. Refrigerate for an hour.
  3. Add ice and garnish with mint to serve.

Notes: To make up one cup of juice I used 3 lemons and 7 passionfruits – but please just take these amounts as approximates. Use what you have. I also dissolved the sugar in one cup of boiling water first before adding the remaining cold water.

Lemon granita

We have three little green lemons on our dwarf trees. We bought the fruit trees a few months ago, and although a few of them have been flowering – it’s exciting because these are the very first fruit. It will be few more weeks before we can pick them but we’ve been having lots of rain so hopefully they’ll survive.

Lemon granita is a refreshing cool me down perfect for the hot muggy weather we’ve been having lately. You can adjust the amounts of lemon and sugar to suit, but remember that when it’s frozen the flavour will be dulled a little. I love the idea that Italians eat granita in the morning.

½ cup white sugar
1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
3 cups of water

  1. Add the sugar to a cup of water and stir to dissolve.
  2. Add the rest of the water and lemon juice and stir.
  3. Transfer the mixture to glass or plastic container and place in the freezer.
  4. After about an hour, take the mixture out of the freeze and stir the ice crystals.
  5. Return to the freeze, and take out every hour to stir and break up the crystals.
  6. The final product will be like a slushy. So if you aren’t serving the same day, you may need to take the mixture out of the freeze and break up the crystals for one final time.
  7. Garnish with mint leaves.

Serves 6.

Tea towel from PataPri.

Tapas (Spanish)

lamb

Cooked for the Spain entry in the Euro Cup and Plate challenge.

Cordero al limon – Lamb with Lemon

250g lean lamb, chunks
225g canned pineapple slices
10 cloves
1 lemon, halved
5 garlic cloves
2 tbsp olive oil
a sprig of rosemary
½ small onion, finely chopped
sweet smoked Spanish paprika, pinch

  1. Cut the lamb into 2cm cubes, put in a bowl, cover with the pineapple slices and let marinate overnight, covered, in the refrigerator.
  2. Preheat the oven to 150°C.
  3. Stick the cloves into the lemon and put it in a roasting dish. Add the garlic, oil and rosemary. Remove the lamb from the pineapple and rub in the onion and paprika.
  4. Add the lamb to a roasting dish and cook for 15 minutes.
  5. Remove the dish from the oven, cover with foil and set aside for 10 minutes.

Patatas bravas – Potatoes in Tomato Sauce

3 tbsp olive oil
600g potatoes, cut into 2 cm cubes
1 small onion, grated
3 garlic cloves, crushed
2 tbsp sherry
125g canned chopped tomatoes
½ tsp freshly grated orange zest
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp freshly chopped flat leaf parsley

  1. Heat 2 tbsp of the oil in a frying pan, add the potatoes and mix well. Cook in batches for 8 minutes until golden brown.
  2. Add in batches the potato back to the pan for another 5 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, heat the remaining oil in another frying pan, add the onion, and cook gently for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sherry, then simmer for 1 minute to burn off the alcohol. Reduce the heat and add the tomatoes, orange zest, sugar, parsley and bay leaf.
  4. Cook for 10 minutes. If required, add some water to stop the mixture thickening too much.
  5. Transfer the cooked potatoes to a serving bowl, pour over the tomato sauce and mix well.

VARIATION – Add ½ tsp dried chili flakes to add more heat to the dish.

TIP – This dish can be made a day in advance and reheated before serving.

Pisto manchego – Courgette, Tomato and Capsicum Stew

2 tbsp olive oil
½ onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 courgette, chopped
2 tomatoes, skinned, deseeded and chopped
1 red capsicum, deseeded and chopped
1 tbsp chopped fresh oregano leaves
sweet Spanish paprika, pinch
salt and pepper

  1. Heat the oil in a frying pan, add the onion and cook over low heat for 5 minutes. Add the garlic, courgette, tomatoes, capsicum, oregano and paprika.
  2. Simmer over low heat for 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, and serve.

VARIATION – Add 50g jamon serrano, finely chopped and cook with the onion.

TIP – This dish can be made a day in advance and reheated before serving.

All dishes serve 2.