How to cook goats’ cheese, onion and potato bread

goat-cheese-bread

So the first recipe I cooked for my Learning how to cook with Delia Smith challenge was goats’ cheese, onion and potato bread with thyme.

I had to preheat my oven to 20 degrees higher than the recipe, because our oven always lets us down and needs adjusting. The red potato I choose was a little too large for the recipe at 250g, so I didn’t use all of it. We had no thyme so I used oregano instead.

I had a heap of trouble with our scales. They only work when you take the battery out of them and then that seems to kick start it, otherwise you can press the on button repeatedly and nothing happens. I had to test my maths skills when I weighted the flour in a bowl.

We didn’t have any self-raising flour, so I added 2 teaspoons of baking powder to add a raising agent to plain flour. I don’t think my grater is very sharp, as the potato kept getting stuck half way when I was grating it. I mixed together the ingredients as per the instructions and the flour stuck to the potato. I wish I had cut the cheese into smaller chunks. I also left out the mustard because we didn’t have any.

My palette knife is over 30 centremetres long, so I stirred the mixture with a teaspoon. I used it for measuring something and was trying to save on washing up! Why I tasted the batter I’m not sure, but it was quite salty. I don’t know whether Matt will like it, because he doesn’t add salt to his food. I used a paella dish for cooking the bread with some baking paper, but I forgot to grease it. I’m usually not very good at following instructions in recipes – I like to get creative and make changes.

Fifty minutes later I had a small loaf which didn’t rise much. The potato bread was yummy with a good crust, although I think I’d prefer the red onion version over spring onion. Matt said “you wouldn’t know there was potato in it” and it “was very nice, a bit like damper.”

Delia’s Complete How to Cook – Fishpond.com.au (Australia)
Delia’s Complete How to Cook – Book Depository (UK)

Written for the Learning how to cook with Delia Smith challenge

Taste test: Goat Pie Guy pies

goat-pie-guy

We have tried Goat Pie Guy pies once before, but we demolished them for breakfast one day at the Mitchelton Farmers markets. I didn’t realise how good they would be. When we spotted them today at the Eagle Farm Markets we knew we had to get some cold to have later for lunch.

I choose the Deluxe Goat Pie, which is their signature pie – rich, tender slow cooked goat meat, infused with honey and thyme, topped with a port & redcurrant jus. The chunks of meat were delicious and sauce just right. The crust nice and short.

Matt choose the Himalayan Goat Pie, which has tender slow cooked goat meat in a rich Nepalese curry with ginger, tomatoes and fragrant spices. He said there were generous chucks of meat and a perfect balance of chilli. A convenient way to eat a really good dry-spiced curry. 

The Goat Pie Guy uses Boer goat meat and there’s a talent to cooking goat so it stays nice and tender. Look out for Goat Pie Guy at your local markets.

Highly recommended.

Getting started in goats

I’m tentatively interested in goats. I’m not sure we will own them while we live in inner Brisbane.

Goats eat brush, leaves, rough plants and weeds.

Goats need:

  • shelter, bedding and secure fencing
  • feed bowls
  • dark-coloured buckets or stock tank
  • mineral feeder and hay feeder

Depending on your requirements you will select one of the following breeds:

Fibre: Agnora or Pygora goats produce mohair. Cashmere are a type, not a breed.

Milk: Your goats will need to have kids. Alpine, Guernsey, Kinder, Lamancha, Oberhasli, Nigerian Dwarf, Nubian, Saanen, Sable, Pygmy, Toggenburg.

Meat: Goats meat is low in fat. Boer, Kiko, Savanna, Spanish, Tennessee

Urban: Nigerian Dwarf or Pygmy

Recommended books

Resources

Pat Coleby reveals why she changed her farming methods

Pat Coleby reveals why she changed her farming methods to natural methods.

I love Pat Coleby’s books. Highly recommended.

Pat Coleby can be found over at Farming Secrets.