Tag Archives: food

How we can eat our landscapes – by Pam Warhurst TED video

What should a community do with its unused land? Plant food, of course. With energy and humor, Pam Warhurst tells at the TED Salon the story of how she and a growing team of volunteers came together to turn plots of unused land into communal vegetable gardens, and to change the narrative of food in their community.

Pam Warhurst co-founded Incredible Edible, an initiative in Todmorden, England dedicated to growing food locally by planting on unused land throughout the community.

For National Volunteer Week.

Ten ways supermarkets in Australia can be more sustainable

Sunday 2 September 2012

Chief Executive Officer
Supermarket Chain
Australia

CC: Marketing Manager

Dear Sir/Madam,

I would love to see Australia lead the world in responsible food management and sustainable practices.

I would love to see my local supermarket follow these practices:

  1. All eggs to be free-range (like Sainsbury’s) – and battery cages banned in the EU.
  2. All pork and bacon to be free-range.
  3. Support grass-fed and organic certified butcher products.
  4. Support sustainable seafood which have been certified against the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard for sustainable and well-managed fisheries.
  5. Support our dairy farmers with fair prices for milk.
  6. Purchase fair trade coffee, chocolate, tea and sugar.
  7. Ban products containing palm oil* – until they are certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO).
  8. Paper products to be recycled where possible (particularly for toilet paper and kitchen paper). Swap from plastic bags to starch-based 100% compostable bags (like Flannerys) or paper bags.
  9. Go BPA free (like Flannerys).
  10. Compulsory labeling of genetically modified food products, so people can choose to go GM-free.

Warm regards,

Gustoso

Notes:

* Palm oil is often listed as ‘vegetable oil’ on a product’s ingredients list. If the product can sit on your shelf for many months then your vegetable oil is probably heated to a high temperature and is damaged. This is known as a trans-fat and should be avoided.

Brisbane Times Good Food Guide Queensland 2012

good-food-guide-2012

I was excited to get my hands on the very first edition of the Brisbane Times Queensland Good Food Guide.

With more than 450 reviews of eateries in Brisbane and covering the top of Queensland right down to Northern New South Wales.

Each review includes price range, opening hours and a score.

The 208 page full colour book is edited by Queensland food writer Natascha Mirosch. She has dispatched more than 25 reviewers all over Brisbane and up to Port Douglas and down to Coolangatta to seek the best places to dine in Queensland. Find out which dining establishments were dished up a coveted Good Food Guide Award chef hat.

The book is available in newsagents and book stores for $24.95.

An online version of the book is available, with access to all of the reviews. For a limited time the website only subscription for Brisbane Times Good Food Guide is only $4.50!!!

This is a Rocketman Media sponsored post.

The Urban Orchard video

The Urban Orchard is a network of households in your local community who are meeting monthly to swap and share the produce of their backyard (or frontyard!) gardens, and conduct workshops on gardening and preserving the harvest.

In November 2007, Friends of the Earth Adelaide and the Goodwood Goodfood Co-op launched a homegrown fruit and vegetable exchange in the inner south-western suburbs of Adelaide. It’s a concept that has been practiced formally and informally in communities probably since time began. The basic format of this particular exchange was inspired by the Urban Orchard project initiated by Melbourne’s CERES community environment park.

The Urban Orchard project was initiated in Adelaide by local community members passionate about gardening, good food and building community.  Through providing a central space for community members to come together and share their homegrown or gleaned surpluses, the exchange offers a number of strong social and environmental benefits, including:

  • reducing waste by redistributing surplus fruit, vegetables, herbs and seeds
  • cultivating networks within the neighbourhood and building stronger communities
  • providing healthy, seasonal food for the community
  • sharing valuable skills in gardening and food preparation
  • avoiding greenhouse gas emissions by reducing the need for produce
  • transported from outside the local area

The Urban Orchard is currently active:

Communities around Australia are adapting the Urban Orchard concept to meet this unique local needs. A  do-it-yourself guide is available for download.

Hungry for Change – about the experts

I’m counting down the days for the new Hungry for Change documentary. Why? Because it’s produced by the same people who did the “Food Matters” documentary, which is my all time favourite food and nutrition movie. Hands down.

If I’ve learnt anything is the last few years, 100% what food you eat does matter to your health.

While waiting for the release, I wanted to find out some more about the experts featured in the new movie.

Wow what an incredible range of talented people.

Documenary review: Growing Change

This commodification of food by industrial agriculture has created a chasm between the grower and the  consumer. But now there’s a change. People want to close that gap in.
- Costa Georgiadis

How will the world feed itself in the future?

Is it possible to grow a fair and sustainable food system?

This film shows an experiment in how to create that change with promising solutions.

In Venezuela, from fishing villages to cocoa plantations to urban gardens, a growing social movement is showing what’s possible when communities, not corporations, start to take control of food.

Sydney filmmaker Simon Cunich went on a 12-month journey from community gardens in Sydney to farming co-operatives in Venezuela.

This documentary has a wonderful positive message. It stands there right next to the now classic Power of Community.

Highly recommended.

Growing Change

Top food gardening books

Here are some of my favourite food gardening books written for an Australian audience.

Discovering Fruit and Nuts - Susanna Lyle

Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture - Rosemary Morrow

How Can I use Herbs in my Daily Life? – Isabell Shipard

Organic Fruit Growing  - Annette McFarlane

Organic Vegetable Gardening - Annette McFarlane

Smart Permaculture Design – Jenny Allen

The Permaculture Home Garden - Linda Woodrow

The Seed Savers Handbook - Jeremy Cherfas, Michel and Jude Fanton

What are your favourite food gardening books?

Future Farmers – Costa Georgiadis – TED video

Costa Georgiadis describes the influence of his family on his love of gardening. I love the example of the old people’s home next to the school garden and the potential interactions between the two. Costa reminds us that there is no such thing as rubbish – we need to think of it as resource recovery.

He ends his inspiring talk with the beautiful quote:

“The joy is not in things, it is in you… “

Green and natural dogs

dash

When we brought home a cute dog from the RSPCA we didn’t know what we were in for! Dash’s two favourite activities are to dig holes in the dirt and chase lizards, which is not so great for our garden. Although, she does loves ripping up boxes and cardboard which we then put in the compost.

Dash was a stray so she was pretty boney when we got her, but now she has put on some weight and is the normal range. She eats very well and  is on a mostly raw diet from The Complete Pet Company. I’ve recently added in yoghurt for the probiotics and coconut oil.

We’ve tried a number of different dog training techniques, but found attending dog training classes with IntaDOGZ were just what we needed. I also liked the following books:

Other good places to buy dog stuff are:

Please do not use tennis balls with your dog, as the yellow fluffy surface is not good for their teeth and gums.

I’m hoping to buy a Doog dog walking belt for Christmas, since I’m getting a little tired of always finding dog bags or treat crumbs in my pockets!