Tag Archives: food

Brisbane Times Good Food Guide Queensland 2012

good-food-guide-2012

I was excited to get my hands on the very first edition of the Brisbane Times Queensland Good Food Guide.

With more than 450 reviews of eateries in Brisbane and covering the top of Queensland right down to Northern New South Wales.

Each review includes price range, opening hours and a score.

The 208 page full colour book is edited by Queensland food writer Natascha Mirosch. She has dispatched more than 25 reviewers all over Brisbane and up to Port Douglas and down to Coolangatta to seek the best places to dine in Queensland. Find out which dining establishments were dished up a coveted Good Food Guide Award chef hat.

The book is available in newsagents and book stores for $24.95.

An online version of the book is available, with access to all of the reviews. For a limited time the website only subscription for Brisbane Times Good Food Guide is only $4.50!!!

This is a Rocketman Media sponsored post.

The Urban Orchard video

The Urban Orchard is a network of households in your local community who are meeting monthly to swap and share the produce of their backyard (or frontyard!) gardens, and conduct workshops on gardening and preserving the harvest.

In November 2007, Friends of the Earth Adelaide and the Goodwood Goodfood Co-op launched a homegrown fruit and vegetable exchange in the inner south-western suburbs of Adelaide. It’s a concept that has been practiced formally and informally in communities probably since time began. The basic format of this particular exchange was inspired by the Urban Orchard project initiated by Melbourne’s CERES community environment park.

The Urban Orchard project was initiated in Adelaide by local community members passionate about gardening, good food and building community.  Through providing a central space for community members to come together and share their homegrown or gleaned surpluses, the exchange offers a number of strong social and environmental benefits, including:

  • reducing waste by redistributing surplus fruit, vegetables, herbs and seeds
  • cultivating networks within the neighbourhood and building stronger communities
  • providing healthy, seasonal food for the community
  • sharing valuable skills in gardening and food preparation
  • avoiding greenhouse gas emissions by reducing the need for produce
  • transported from outside the local area

The Urban Orchard is currently active:

Communities around Australia are adapting the Urban Orchard concept to meet this unique local needs. A  do-it-yourself guide is available for download.

Hungry for Change – about the experts

I’m counting down the days for the new Hungry for Change documentary. Why? Because it’s produced by the same people who did the “Food Matters” documentary, which is my all time favourite food and nutrition movie. Hands down.

If I’ve learnt anything is the last few years, 100% what food you eat does matter to your health.

While waiting for the release, I wanted to find out some more about the experts featured in the new movie.

Wow what an incredible range of talented people.

Documenary review: Growing Change

This commodification of food by industrial agriculture has created a chasm between the grower and the  consumer. But now there’s a change. People want to close that gap in.
- Costa Georgiadis

How will the world feed itself in the future?

Is it possible to grow a fair and sustainable food system?

This film shows an experiment in how to create that change with promising solutions.

In Venezuela, from fishing villages to cocoa plantations to urban gardens, a growing social movement is showing what’s possible when communities, not corporations, start to take control of food.

Sydney filmmaker Simon Cunich went on a 12-month journey from community gardens in Sydney to farming co-operatives in Venezuela.

This documentary has a wonderful positive message. It stands there right next to the now classic Power of Community.

Highly recommended.

Growing Change

Top food gardening books

Here are some of my favourite food gardening books written for an Australian audience.

Discovering Fruit and Nuts - Susanna Lyle

Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture - Rosemary Morrow

How Can I use Herbs in my Daily Life? – Isabell Shipard

Organic Fruit Growing  - Annette McFarlane

Organic Vegetable Gardening - Annette McFarlane

Smart Permaculture Design – Jenny Allen

The Permaculture Home Garden - Linda Woodrow

The Seed Savers Handbook - Jeremy Cherfas, Michel and Jude Fanton

What are your favourite food gardening books?

Future Farmers – Costa Georgiadis – TED video

Costa Georgiadis describes the influence of his family on his love of gardening. I love the example of the old people’s home next to the school garden and the potential interactions between the two. Costa reminds us that there is no such thing as rubbish – we need to think of it as resource recovery.

He ends his inspiring talk with the beautiful quote:

“The joy is not in things, it is in you… “

Green and natural dogs

dash

When we brought home a cute dog from the RSPCA we didn’t know what we were in for! Dash’s two favourite activities are to dig holes in the dirt and chase lizards, which is not so great for our garden. Although, she does loves ripping up boxes and cardboard which we then put in the compost.

Dash was a stray so she was pretty boney when we got her, but now she has put on some weight and is the normal range. She eats very well and  is on a mostly raw diet from The Complete Pet Company. I’ve recently added in yoghurt for the probiotics and coconut oil.

We’ve tried a number of different dog training techniques, but found attending dog training classes with IntaDOGZ were just what we needed. I also liked the following books:

Other good places to buy dog stuff are:

Please do not use tennis balls with your dog, as the yellow fluffy surface is not good for their teeth and gums.

I’m hoping to buy a Doog dog walking belt for Christmas, since I’m getting a little tired of always finding dog bags or treat crumbs in my pockets!

Documentary review: Forks over Knives

The “Forks over knives” dvd has just been released overseas, and I was fortunate to receive my copy on pre-order.

The documentary examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting our present menu of animal-based and processed foods.

The main storyline traces the personal journeys of Dr. T. Colin Campbell, a nutritional scientist from Cornell University, and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, a former top surgeon at the world renowned Cleveland Clinic. Inspired by remarkable discoveries in their young careers, these men conducted several groundbreaking studies. Their separate research led them to the same startling conclusion: degenerative diseases like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and even several forms of cancer, could almost always be prevented—and in many cases reversed—by  adopting a whole foods, plant-based diet.

You may have heard of Dr Campbell from his book ‘The China Study‘.

The cameras also follow some of their patients who have chronic conditions from heart disease to diabetes, and are taught by their doctors to adopt a whole foods plant-based diet as the primary approach to treat their ailments.

Keep your eye out for this one, or over your copy over at amazon Forks over Knives.

I’m allergic to chilli and paprika

I tell people I’m allergic to chilli and they just don’t get it. They think I don’t like spicy food. Actually I love spicy food and used to love the taste of chilli in curries. Fortunately, I don’t have a life threatening true allergy to chilli, it’s an intolerance. I do, however, get terrible double-over tummy cramps if I eat anything with chilli or paprika in it.

Many companies have started to add chilli to their food to add flavour (especially ones that are trying to reduce fat, salt and sugar levels). Even though the food labelling laws are fairly good in Australia, it can be listed under a generic label of “spices”, which incidentally can also include MSG. It is possible to contact the company and find out precisely what the ingredients of a particular product are and I have found the majority of companies I have contacted very helpful.

Although I have had people lie to me about what is in their food. I can’t believe how ignorant people are about allergies and intolerances.

Here are some of the foods that I’ve learnt to be careful with:

  • Beetroot, tinned – containing spices. Edgell sliced beetroot in a tin is safe.
  • Greek restaurants – often sprinkle paprika over their meat, including kebabs.
  • Grill’d burgers – contain spices. They did not reply to my email to say if it was chilli or not.
  • Herbamare Spicy – contains chilli. The Original version is safe.
  • KFC – original and hot’n'spicy chicken, bbq sauces. Chips are safe.
  • McDonalds – most of their burgers contain spices.
  • The Meating Place – 100% beef sausages actually contain paprika. Their 100% pork sausages contain nutmeg.
  • Mustard – often contains spices.
  • Nandos – cross-contamination
  • Olives and pickles- often contain spices. Be wary of spoon swapping in delis and at the markets. Sandhurt Sicilian green olives are safe.
  • Red food colouring – often listed as natural as it’s paprika.
  • Red Rooster – the stuffing and the seasoning on the chicken contains spices. Ask for no salt on the chips and add your own.
  • Salami
  • Seasonings – Masterfood’s All Purpose Seasoning, Chicken Salt, Italian Herbs, Pizza Topper, etc