The Big Fat Fix – Film Review

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The Big Fat Fix is a documentary about food, health and fitness. It is independently produced by British Cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra and former international athlete Donal O’Neill.

Donal has produced two other documentaries on the low carbohydrate and high-fat diet called ‘Cereal Killers’ and ‘Run on Fat’, but this one is my favourite of all of them.

The documentary begins in the Italian town of Pioppi where we hear about the Mediterranean diet and how it has been misconstrued by the media and Dr Ancel Keys. There is no Mediterranean Diet – the Greek word ‘diaita’ actually means ‘lifestyle’.

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Dr Malhotra demonstrates clearly how inflammation impacts on the arteries and heart health. He then talks about his prescription for avoiding and turning around obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. It is possible to turn around the disease process and become more heart healthy in just 21 days.

Donal addresses functional fitness and leds Aseem through some fitness activities in a natural park with logs, rocks and trees. (He calls in tabata but it looks more like movnat to me). They talk about the benefits of vitamin D, sleep, quality olive oil, fatty acids, local produce, avoiding sugar and the re-engineering of wheat.


The Big Fat Fix is a great introduction to the low-carb, high-fat lifestyle. You can download and stream the documentary from the website.

Sacred Economics short film

Sacred Economics is a short film by Charles Eisenstein on money, gift in an age of transition.

In keeping with one of the main themes of the book, gift economics, Charles has made the full text of the book Sacred Economics available online as a gift.

Documenary review: Growing Change

This commodification of food by industrial agriculture has created a chasm between the grower and the  consumer. But now there’s a change. People want to close that gap in.
– Costa Georgiadis

How will the world feed itself in the future?

Is it possible to grow a fair and sustainable food system?

This film shows an experiment in how to create that change with promising solutions.

In Venezuela, from fishing villages to cocoa plantations to urban gardens, a growing social movement is showing what’s possible when communities, not corporations, start to take control of food.

Sydney filmmaker Simon Cunich went on a 12-month journey from community gardens in Sydney to farming co-operatives in Venezuela.

This documentary has a wonderful positive message. It stands there right next to the now classic Power of Community.

Highly recommended.

Growing Change

GMO Film Project

GMO Film

By the simple act of feeding ourselves, we unwittingly participate in the largest experiment ever conducted on human beings. Massive agro-chemical companies like Monsanto (Agent Orange, Round Up, Searle, NutraSweet, Bayer) and Dow (Napalm) are feeding us genetically-modified food, GMO’s, that have never been fully tested and aren’t labeled. This small handful of corporations are tightening their grip on the world’s food supply—buying, modifying, and patenting seeds to ensure total control over everything we eat.

The GMO Film Project tells the story of a father’s discovery of GMO’s through the symbolic act of poor Haitian farmers burning seeds in defiance of Monsanto’s gift of 475 tons of hybrid corn and vegetable seeds to Haiti shortly after the devastating earthquake. After a journey to Haiti to learn why hungry farmers would burn seeds, the real awakening of what has happened to our food, what we are feeding our families, and what is at stake for the global food supply unfolds in a trip across the United States in search of answers.

Are we at a tipping point? Is it time to take back our food? The encroaching darkness of unknown health and environmental risks, seed take over, chemical toxins, and food monopoly meets with the light of a growing resistance of organic farmers, concerned citizens, and a burgeoning movement to take back what we have lost.

We still have time to heal the planet, feed the world, and live sustainably. But we have to start now.

For more information on GM Foods in Australia visit Truefood.

Documentary films for foodies

Here’s a round up of some of the better documentary films which deal with food and diet that I’ve seen in the last couple of years:

Future of Food– A scary film about the dominance of certain companies trying to monopolise food supply and the dangers of genetic modification. See also the Future of Food website. Sadly the GM ban was recently lifted in Australia – so please be wary of any products containing canola, cotton, cotton seed oil, corn and soybeans.
King Corn – A documentary about two friends who grew an acre of corn over a year. They then follow its path into the food chain and into their hair! Corn feed cattle feedlots are disgusting.
Simply Raw – Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days: An amazing story of a handful of courageous diabetics who go raw for 30 days. Some of them reduce their insulin dependence and lose weight, and others drop out from the sheer difficulty in sticking to the diet. But it’s pretty inspiring, nevertheless. There is an accompanying website called Raw for 30 Days.
Super Size Me – A popular film featuring Morgan Spurluck, who documents his health while eating McDonald’s for 30 days. Maccas was forced to change their menus after it’s release, and withdraw its super-sized fries and drinks.
Food Matters – A panel of experts talk about the important role that diet does play in the prevention and reversal of many diseases.