Bean Brewding Self-guided Coffee Tours

bean-brewding-self-guided

Bean Brewding have just released a self-guided Brisbane CBD coffee tour.  You can use their handy guide which includes a map and all the contact details of eight of the leading coffee spots. You’ll be able to explore some of Brisbane’s best independent coffee styles, roasters and café environments. You can use the guide in your own time with your friends or family, or during your breaks at work with your colleagues.

This exclusive guide will allow you to have one free coffee and give your 10% off your next Bean Brewding coffee tour.

Download your copy of Bean Brewding’s self-guided Brisbane CBD coffee tour here.

What is third wave coffee?

coffee-cup-red

So what does third wave coffee mean? Let’s back it up and explain what first wave and second wave coffee are first.

The first wave of coffee occurred with the freeze-drying techniques after the Second World War Coffee became a popular beverage, although the quality was not the best.

The second wave of coffee was the global domination of Starbucks and other chains of coffee shops, and included the trend in home espresso machines. It is characterised by a shift from Robusta to Arabica coffee beans. Coffee quality improved, although there was a rise in adding sweeteners, syrups and other ingredients to coffee to change the taste.

The third wave of coffee is treating coffee like an artesian product, similar to the way we treat a fine chocolate or wine or cheese. It is characterised by single origin coffee and being able to trace a coffee back to an individual coffee plantation. It celebrates coffee for its unique attributes and taste. Consumers are happy to pay a higher price for a better product and one which is produced sustainably and with fair trade methods.

Consumers are in an enviable position in being able to taste some of the best third wave coffee from around the world at their local and independent espresso bar.

If you are in Brisbane, you may like to attend a Bean Brewding Coffee Tour to find out more about the third wave of coffee.

Taste test: Just Fair Coffee and Mundial Coffee

griffiths-coffee

I was keen to try Griffiths Coffee after I found out that not only was it organic but fair trade as well. You can trace the journey of the beans by typing in the code found on every Just Fair Coffee can.

Just Fair Coffee is a smooth and dark coffee made from 100% Arabica coffee beans from Honduras and Peru. The coffee is rich and full-bodied with a smooth nutty cocoa taste and sweet honey undertone. It is best for espresso, if you like dark Italian coffee and has a nice cremea.

We tried the whole beans, but it also comes pre-ground. There is also a decaffeinated blend available that comes from Peru, and has a nutty flavour with a clear citrus aftertaste.

For a limited time, Griffiths Coffee has created the Mundial 14 blend using coffee beans from countries in the 2014 World Cup including Brazil. I enjoyed my cuppa while watching the football early in the morning.

Just Fair Coffee is the only Fair trade organic coffee on the Australian market that comes in a reusable and fully recyclable can.

Available from independent supermarkets and delis and direct from Griffiths Coffee.

Thank you to Griffiths Coffee for providing samples.

Espresso, date and pecan muffins

espresso-muffin

These espresso, date and pecan muffins are an ideal morning tea treat.  I’ve adapted this from a recipe which was originally figs and walnuts, so you could substitute those instead. The espresso gives them a nice coffee kick which helps blow away the cobwebs.

Espresso, date and pecan muffins recipe

200g dried dates, pitted
150ml strong coffee
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
200g brown sugar
250g plain flour
a pinch of salt
115g butter, melted
2 eggs, beaten
75g pecans, roughly chopped

  1. Line a 12 hole muffin tray with muffin papers, and preheat the oven to 200 degrees C.
  2. Finely chop the dates and then soak them in the coffee in a bowl. Add the bicarbonate of soda.
  3. Put the sugar and flour in a large mixing bowl with a pinch of salt.
  4. Combine the melted butter and eggs in a bowl or jug.
  5. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ones, add the date and coffee mixture, the pecans and stir together quickly. Do not overmix.
  6. Spoon the batter into the prepared cases and bake for 25-30 minutes, until well risen and golden.

Makes 12.

Review: Puk Coffee

Puk Espresso sign

Puk Coffee is located underneath the Storey Bridge at Kangaroo Point, so you’d expect it to be noisy, but you can’t hear the traffic at all.

Puk Coffee outside

We sat outside where the Ekka winds made it a little cool but a beautiful day for winter. I wish I’d worn my jumper.

Puk Moonshine Coffee

Puk have swapped coffee suppliers and now serve Moonshine Coffee Roasters coffee from Federal, in the hinterland near Byron Bay, New South Wales. They also serve T2 tea.

Puk mocha

I had a delicious mocha, which I couldn’t fault.

Puk espresso

Matt had a short black, which he thought was very smooth. How cool is the cup?

Puk breakfast bagel

The menu had a good selection of reasonably priced items – all of which were under $10. We both ordered the breakfast bagel, which was a free range omelet, with double bacon and BBQ sauce. I found mine a little peppery, but a filling way to start a Sunday.

Puk Coffee
98 Main St
Kangaroo Point, Brisbane

Puk Espresso on Urbanspoon

Coffee Ground to Ground

“I have been collecting used coffee grounds since about November 2010. I haven’t used a huge amount, probably 30 Kilos (at one stage I hauled a 10kg bag home). But even this has been enough to see the results in the garden! No more ants- they had been eating out the root systems from many of my plants and when I added coffee grounds to the garden they stopped immediately. I have also found plants have shot up and are full of colour.”

“I have found that pests like ants, snails and slugs stay away as well as my cat! The cat seems to think my garden is her personal litter box and kept digging up plants as well. Since putting the used coffee grounds on the garden I haven’t found anything disturbed.”

Did you know that coffee grounds are a fantastic compost material that are free to collect and use?

The Ground to Ground website caters for this opportunity, by delivering news, views, research, and general information on the reuse of coffee grounds for compost and gardening. Of the tonnes of used coffee grounds that are discarded each day, only a small amount is collected for reuse – which is a real pity considering the good that can come from a group effort.

Recycling coffee grounds would have to be one of the easiest ways to make a difference, and for anyone interested in gardening, composting, vermiculture, or just environmental awareness, the Ground to Ground website can show you how to get involved for all our benefit.
Please help spread the word about this great initiative and tell your barista about it at your local coffee bar or cafe.

The Ground To Ground Map – Find Used Coffee Grounds

20 Ways to resuse coffee grounds and tea leaves – Treehugger

Organic pest control recipes

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It’s important to think of your backyard as a mini ecosystem where all the elements need to be balanced. So when you do get an invasion of pests, the predator bugs will deal with them in a few days and keep their numbers down. Some times the best solution is just to sit back and let nature sort itself out.

If that doesn’t work, then you can make your own pest control solutions with these organic recipes:

Chilli soap mix – Aphids
Add a generous handful of hot chilies and a tablespoon of pure soap flakes to a litre of hot water and puree in a blender. Strain the mixture through  a stocking. Spray directly onto the aphids and they will quickly die. Several applications may be necessary for particularly bad infestations.

Coffee spray – Slugs and snails
Dilute one part strong espresso coffee to ten parts water and spray it liberally over the foliage of plants that are being eaten by slugs and snails, and on the soil around their base. When the pests travel across the coffee mixture, they absorb it and quickly die.

Milk spray – Fungal diseases, including powdery mildew
Combine one part organic milk to ten parts water and cover the upper and lower surfaces of the leaves and stems thoroughly. This can be used as a preventative measure during humid conditions which favour mildews.

Vegetable oil soap mix – Mites and scale
Blend 2 cups of vegetable oil with half a cup of pure liquid soap and mix thoroughly. Dilute one tablespoon of the mix with a litre of water and spray over infestations. The pests will suffocate and soon die.

Do you have any tried and true organic pest contol methods?