Best plants for Brisbane’s weather

strawberry-watercolour

I attended a seminar on vegetable gardens presented by Tim Auld. He encouraged the group to brainstrorm the best plants for each of the seasons in Brisbane.

He explained that the traditional seasonal climates (spring, summer, autumn and winter) are mostly applicable to southern states of Australia. Queensland has a more temperate climate (sub-tropic) and further north have a tropical wet season (Dec – March).

Here’s the list of plants the group came up with:

Plants for the wet season (December to March):

  • ceylon spinach, choko, kang kong, melons, squash,  snake beans, sweet potato, taro and yams

Plants for a Cool temperate summer (April to August):

  • broccoli, carrot, garlic, lettuce, onions, peas, potatoes, radish, silverbeet, spinach, and tomatoes

Plants for a Mediterranean summer (September to November):

  •  basil, beans, beetroot, capsicum, chilli, corn, melons, silverbeet, and squash

I can change your mind about… climate

Do you think you can change someone’s mind about climate change?

A new ABC television show  “I Can Change Your Mind About..Climate” seeks to address that question.

The website features a survey you can take to find out your views before the show airs.

I’d like to see them change a sceptic’s mind, but that can be hard work…. perhaps there is a better way?

I like the approach George Marshall from Talking Climate takes in the video above. He asks what the best way of talking to a cli­mate ‘denier’ is, including advice on lan­guage, framing, and a dis­cus­sion of whether ‘denier’ is even the right way of thinking about the problem. From How to talk to a climate change denier.

List of Transition Town groups and initiatives in Brisbane

transition-brisbane

Transition Brisbane aims to support the city transition from oil dependency to local resilience.

It is a Hub of the Transition Network, which is a world wide movement to support community-led responses to peak oil and climate change, while building resilience and happiness.

Here is a list of the Transition groups and initiatives in the greater Brisbane area:

  • Enoggera Transition
  • Samford Green Street
  • Scenic Rim Transition
  • Sandgate Transition Town
  • Sustainable Jamboree – based in the Jamboree Ward of Brisbane and surrounds (all are welcome)
  • Sustainable Redlands
  • St. Johns Wood Sustainability – St John’s Wood
  • Transition Ashgrove
  • Transition Annerley – Annerley, Fairfield, Moorooka, Fairfield, Tarragindi, Yeronga
  • Transition Bardon – The Grove, The Gap, St John’s Wood
  • Transition East – Balmoral, Bulimba, Camp Hill, Cannon Hill, Hawthorne, Morningside, Norman Park, Seven Hills
  • Transition Kurilpa – Highgate Hill, Hill End, South Brisbane, West End
  • Transition The Gap
  • Transition The Grove – Arana Hills, Ferny Hills, Ferny Grove, Grovely, Keperra, Upper Kedron
  • Transition Town Kenmore – The Pullenvale Ward; Anstead, Bellbowrie, Brookfield, Chapel Hill, Kenmore, Moggill, Pullenvale and Upper Brookfield

Please note these groups are run by volunteers and some are still in the start up stage.

Join us online: http://www.brisbanetransitionhub.ning.com/

 

Fruit trees for Brisbane backyards

fruit_trees

I’ve decided to expand our selection of fruit trees in our permaculture garden. I realised that I didn’t own any useful gardening books on fruit trees, particularly ones that would help me decide which fruit trees are suitable for Brisbane’s climate and are less than 5 metres so that I can cram lots in and have lots of variety.

I ended up posting to the Brisbane Local Food ning and got a great response. I love the way online forums facilitate answers that are better than what I would have come up from reading a book. Thanks to everyone who helped me compile this list:

  • acerola cherry
  • apples, dwarf sub-tropical (Golden Dorsett , Tropical Anna, Tropical Sweet)
  • avocado, dwarf
  • banana
  • barbados cherry
  • blueberries (Sharp Blue – self-pollinating and low chill)
  • calamondin
  • crab apple
  • custard apple
  • dragon fruit
  • fig
  • grapes
  • grumichama
  • guava
  • jaboticaba
  • lemon
  • lime
  • longan (protected from birds and possums)
  • lychee
  • macadamia (pot)
  • mandarin, dwarf (freemont)
  • mango, dwarf
  • mulberry, dwarf (red shatoot)
  • native raspberry (scrambling bush)
  • nectarine (low chill)
  • orange – washington; Lanes late; Valencia and red ruby;
  • pawpaw
  • pepino
  • persimmon (but you’d need to prune it to under 5m)
  • pomegranate
  • plumcote
  • pomelo
  • sea grape tree
  • soursop
  • tamarillos
  • thai apple

I’d love to hear if you are successfully growing any other fruit trees in the Brisbane area?

If you live outside of Brisbane, you may like the list of trees for a suburban food forest.