Paleo blueberry ice blocks

paleo-blueberry-ice-blocks

This ice block is a delicious combination of blueberries and coconut milk. You could use strawberries, blackberries or any combination of berries or other fruits in this recipe. Add a tablespoon of honey if you’d like them to be a little sweeter.

Ice block moulds can be found in $2 shops or kitchen shops, otherwise use plastic cups and paddle pop sticks. You may need to double the recipe if your moulds are bigger.

Paleo blueberry ice blocks

1 cup of coconut milk
1 cup of fresh or frozen blueberries

  1. Combine coconut milk and blueberries in a jug. Blend with stick blender. Pour mixture into ice block moulds.
  2. Place lid on moulds and place them in the freezer for a minimum of six hours.

Makes 4 ice blocks.

Nuts berry crumble

This is a raw nuts berry crumble inspired by the Renegade Health Show’s recipe for Blazing Berry Crumble. The only problem was my food processor has given up the ghost, so this is a quick version.

LSA stands for linseeds, sunflower seeds and almonds. Linseeds are also known as flaxseeds. It’s better to grind these up yourself fresh using a coffee bean grinder or a mortar and pestle. If you do buy them pre-ground from the shop, make sure they were stored in the fridge. When you get them home put them in an air-tight container and keep in the fridge for up to a month. They are packed full of fibre, calcium, essential fatty acids, protein and minerals.

1 Tbsp LSA
1 Tbsp hazelnut meal
1 Tbsp honey
1 small punnet of strawberries

  1. Hull and quarter the strawberries.
  2. Add the LSA and hazelnut meal, stirring to mix.
  3. Add the honey and stir well to serve straight away.

Serves 1-2.

Strawberry smoothie

This is an great way to have your two fruits a day. I think we have lost the strawberries that were growing in the hanging basket. I might have forgotten to water them for about a week, as they aren’t near the rest of the fruit trees and vegetable beds. I adore the taste of home-grown strawberries, but at the moment they’re not contributing anything to our challenge. My second lot are doing well, so I’ll need to be more diligent with them.

I’ve used frozen strawberries for this recipe, but you can substitute any of the other berries. Adjust the quantities to suit your taste, but if you are using frozen items make sure your blender can do ice, otherwise you might wreck the blades. The mixture is thick, so you may like to add more liquid to serve 2 people. I also add a spoonful of flaxseed oil to keep my skin healthy, but that’s optional.

Strawberry smoothie

½ cup fresh or frozen strawberries
1/4 cup of almond milk, rice milk, or milk
1 banana, small, cubed
1 teaspoon honey
4 ice cubes (optional)

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.

Serves 1.

Trees for a suburban food forest

I haven’t mentioned that we have about 10 dwarf fruit trees in pots, that we purchased at various times in 2008.

To decide which ones to plant, I made a list of all the trees that were under 3-4metres high, could be grown in a pot and trimmed to size and/or available as a dwarf. I was surprised at the variety available. When purchasing trees also consider their suitability to your climate, water requirements and whether or not you like the fruit they produce. If you eat lots of apple (say), you may like to consider getting a few different varieties – one that fruits early, one middle and one late season.

Here’s a list of suitable trees for suburban backyards:

  • Acerola Cherry
  • Apple (d)
  • Atherton Raspberry
  • Australian Round Lime
  • Avocado (d)
  • Babaco
  • Bananas
  • Black sapote
  • Blackberry
  • Blueberry
  • Boysenberry
  • Calamondin
  • Cape Gooseberry
  • Casana
  • Cassava
  • Ceylon Hill Gooseberry
  • Cherry
  • Chilli
  • Chinese Water Chestnut
  • Choko (v)
  • Cocona
  • Coffee
  • Comfrey
  • Currant (Red or Black)
  • Davidson’s Plum (p)
  • Fig (d)
  • Finger lime
  • Ginger
  • Goji Berry
  • Gooseberry
  • Governer’s Plum
  • Grape (v)
  • Grapefruit (d)
  • Grumichama Cherry
  • Guava
  • Jaboticaba
  • Japanese raisin
  • Jelly Palm / Wine Palm
  • Jerusalem Artichoke
  • Kakadu Plum
  • Kei Apple
  • Keriberry
  • Kiwifruit (v)
  • Kumquat (d)
  • Lemon (d)
  • Lemonade (d)
  • Lillypilly
  • Lime (d)
  • Loganberry
  • Loquat (d)
  • Macadamia (d)
  • Madrono
  • Mandarin (d)
  • Mango (d)
  • Medlar
  • Midyim
  • Miracle Fruit
  • Monstera
  • Mulberry (d)
  • Naranjilla
  • Natal Plum
  • Olive (d)
  • Orange (d)
  • Passionfruit (v)
  • Paw paw
  • Peach (d)
  • Pepino
  • Persimmon (d)
  • Pineapple
  • Plum
  • Plumcott
  • Plummelo
  • Pomegranate (d)
  • Raspberry
  • Rhubarb
  • Sea Grape
  • Strawberry
  • Tamarillo
  • Tangelo
  • Taro
  • Tea
  • Ugni
  • Yacon
  • Youngberry

Legend: (d) – dwarf available; (v) – vine; (p) – pot.

These edible trees, vines and others may be available in Australia from:

Please let us know if you have any other recommendations.

Update – I have more recently compiled a list of fruit trees for Brisbane backyards.

Berry coulis with chocolate cake

As this blog is supposed to be about fruit and vegetables try to ignore the chocolate cake for a moment.

How easy is coulis to make? Absolutely lick-out-the-container-delicious and dead easy. You don’t even really need a recipe. Well, you won’t after the first time.

Raspberry Coulis

¼ cup of raspberries blitzed in the blender
add juice from half a lime (or quarter of a lemon) and 3 teaspoons of sugar to taste

You can try other fruits to make coulis (French for uncooked fruit sauces), such as strawberries, blueberries, mangoes, and kiwi fruits.  If you are  pedantic, you may like to  strain out the seeds. Drizzle over chocolate cake or dessert of choice.

Chocolate Cake

For this gorgeous gluten free chocolate cake I used Cocoa Farm chocolate to give it a hint of fruity shiraz. It’s great to see an all Australian company coming up with innovative products. I can’t wait to try their Orange Organic Dark Chocolate.

150g chocolate
100g butter
100g brown sugar
150g almond meal
3 eggs, organic and free range

  1. Pre-heat oven to 170°C
  2. Melt together butter and chocolate in a bowl over a pot of simmering water. (Or use microwave on low if you are game).
  3. Separate eggs and set whites aside.
  4. Cream together yolks and sugar until pale and doubled in size. Add melted chocolate to egg mixture and beat on slow speed until combined. Fold in almond meal with a spatula.
  5. Whisk egg whites to stiff peaks.
  6. Fold whites through cake mixture.
  7. Transfer mixture to a greased cake tin.
  8. Bake for 25 to 40 minutes.
  9. Cake should be springy in the middle and skewer should come out clean. Remove from oven and transfer to cooling rack.

B.T.W. Try to avoid blitzing frozen raspberries near clean washing up. It was hard to mop up and hide the evidence of all the red segments flicked all over the place. Blend in the sink people.