Kooee! Grass Fed Jerky

kooee-jerky

My husband is a huge fan of chilli and has been exploring how hot he can handle it. We were looking forward to trying the two spicy flavours of Kooee! Jerky.

We rated the Habenero chilli as 4.5 out 5 hot, while the smoked chipotle was rated a more moderate 2.5 out of 5 hot. This Tasmanian-based company makes beef jerky in other flavours, like classic sea salt and native mountain pepperberry. They use Tasmanian beef which is raised free-range and 100% grass-fed, which might explain why the beef jerky is so tasty.

The Kooee! beef jerky is a high protein, paleo-friendly and gluten free snack. It doesn’t contain soy, gluten, added sugar, preservatives or GMO products like some of the jerky you will find in the supermarket.

kooee-jerky-bowl

I love eating jerky and this one is definitely moreish. I found myself finishing a whole packet in one sitting! The slices of dehydrated beef offer a nice balance between the spicy chipotle, coconut aminos, apple cider vinegar and sea salt.

The jerky is healthy and convenient to carry around with you, so you could put it in your backpack for bushwalking or take it to work. Each 30g packet contains 15g of protein. The meat is easy to chew through and bite off because it is cut against the grain. You won’t feel like you are chewing like a cow!

Kooee! Beef Jerky is produced in small amounts and is sold at the Hobart Farmers Markets and Launceston Farmers Markets. It’s lucky that you can order Kooee! Beef Jerky from their online shop at www.kooeesnacks.com.au.

Basic healing stock

healing-stock

Here’s my basic healing stock recipe (aka bone broth). I’ve keep the list of ingredients simple so that if you are on an elimination diet you can add or subtract as needed. It’s best to prepare this recipe when you are going to be home all day. The longer you simmer the bones the more nutritious your end result will be.

Meat stock aids digestion and has been know for centuries as a healing folk remedy for the digestive tract. Also homemade meat stock is extremely nourishing; it is full of minerals, vitamins, amino-acids and various other nutrients in a very bio-available form.
– Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride

It is also best to use organic bones as they will have more nutrients. The best bones to use are soup, shank, ribs, marrow, oxtail or knuckle bones. If you are using organic carrots you can leave them unpeeled as most of the nutrients are in the skin, otherwise peel them.

If you are going to be making a few batches of stock in the coming weeks and want to save time later, you can cut up all of the vegetables (carrots, celery and parsley) and put them in zip lock bags to freeze for when you have some more bones ready.

Basic healing stock recipe

chicken carcass; or bones (with marrow preferred)
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 celery stalks, including the leaves
2 carrots
parsley
Celtic sea salt

  1. Add the bones to the pot and cover with water. Add a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to help get maximum nutrients out of the bones.
  2. Cut up the celery stalks, carrot and parsley finely and then add them to the pot. Add a teaspoon a sea salt.
  3. Simmer with lid on for at least 4 hours, but preferably 8 hours or more.
  4. Skim off any scum from the top using a spoon. Top up with water as required.
  5. When finished, allow the stock to cool and then pour stock through a strainer and transfer to storage. You can also use cheese cloth or chux wipes to strain the stock. Pick off any meat to eat later. Discard the bones.
  6. If you want to remove the fat when you are finished cool the stock down and then place in the refrigerator overnight. The fat will rise to the top and you will be able to remove the solidified layer with a spoon. When often strain the mixture a second time in the morning. If your stock has jellied it is rich in gelatin.

The stock will keep for at least a week in the fridge or can be frozen in zip-lock bags.

Other optional ingredients to add:

2 tbsps thyme
pepper
4 cloves of garlic (if not fructose intolerant)
1-2 onions or leeks (if not fructose intolerant)
cabbage (if not raffinose intolerant)

100 recipes: Beef burger

Best recipe
Wagyu burger
– Justin North

About

A good hamburger should be made of quality ingredients.

The first secret of success is to build flavour and moistness into the mixture; the second is to handle it lightly when shaping so that it holds together without compacting.
– Margaret Fulton, Encyclopedia of food and cookery

Variations

About | 100 Recipes | Outtakes

Beef stew with beer and dumplings (Dutch)

Dutch beer stew

Cooked for the Dutch entry of the Euro Cup and Plate challenge.

500g gravy or stewing beef, cubed
½ cup flour
3 tbsp oil
1 large onion, sliced
2 minced garlic cloves
1 tbsp brown sugar
2 tsp red wine vinegar
3 tbsp chopped parsley
1 bay leaf
¼ tsp thyme
¼ tsp black pepper
1 cup of beef stock
330ml dark beer (German Hefeweizen Dunkel would be perfect)

Dumplings
1 cup flour
2 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp salt
1 tbsp organic butter
2/3 cup milk

Red cabbage and apple
We used ‘The Dutch Company’ from a jar

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C
  2. Cover the beef chunks in flour, then brown in oil in a Dutch oven. Remove and set aside.
  3. Brown the onion and garlic in the same oil. Add the brown sugar, half the wine vinegar, thyme, pepper, bay leaf and chopped parsley.
  4. Pour the stock over the stew and then add the beer.
  5. Cover and bake for 2 hours at 160°C
  6. While the stew is baking, make the dumplings. Mix the flour, baking soda and salt together. Mix the butter in (melt first), and then stir in the milk. The batter should be a little dry but fluffy.
  7. Take the stew out of the oven and drop the dumpling batter by the tablespoon into the stew.
  8. Put the stew back in to the oven for a further 15 minutes.
  9. Serve with warmed up red cabbage and apple.

Serves 2-3.