List of Australian Paleo Websites

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Here is a list of some of the Australian based Paleo and primal food bloggers and websites:

Photo by Jan

Directory of Paleo and Primal Food in Australia

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Here’s a list of paleo and primal food in Australia. Please leave a comment if you have anything to add. Thanks for all the contributions over at Mark’s Daily Apple.

World wide

Australia wide

  • Organic dates: Coles but not Woolworths
  • Coconut milk and cream with no additives/emulsifiers etc: Ayam-brand coconut milk in the Asian section. There is also an organic line. – Woolworths.
  • Organic shredded coconut, Macro-brand: Woolworths
  • Macro almond butter – Woolworths
  • Grass fed meat – Aldi
  • Lindt 85% chocolate, Green and Blacks 85% chocolate – Woolworths, Coles, IGA
  • Chocolate, coconut sugar etc – Loving Earth
  • Free range chicken – Coles and Woolworths
  • 180 nutrition protein powder
  • Paleo Hero – muesli, bars and supplements
  • Paleo Café – various locations
  • Coconut yoghurt: Coyo
  • Grass fed butter – Mainland Butter and Anchor butter and Westgold
  • beef jerky – Geronimo Jerky
  • Organic coconut oil – http://www.aclarahealth.com.au/products.htm
  • Nuilife coconut oil
  • Spiral Foods coconut oil
  • Various – Honest to Goodness

Adelaide and South Australia

  • Meat – organic/grass-fed etc: P&O organic butchers, located in the city in the David Jones basement in Food Glorious Food, and also on Magill Road. The Magill Road one is far more useful if you are looking for the more ‘uncommon’ parts of meat.
  • Coconut Oil – available in several places in and around the Central Market, but for the best value/selection I go to Goodies and Grains in the Central Markets (Gouger St side).
  • Coconut Flour – order it through the health food store in Burnside Village.
  • Spices/nuts/dutch pressed cocoa/agave nectar – Goodies and Grains in Central Market

Brisbane and Queensland

  • Grass fed beef: Super Butchers have a wide selection of grass-fed beef.
  • Grass fed meat: Meatcart – Online butchers
  • Grass fed beef and lamb delivered throughout Queensland – Mitchell Grass Meats
  • Queensland Natural Beef at Toogoolawah have grass fed beef, lamb and pork
  • Gympie St Terrace Butchery is the place to go. You can even order nitrate free bacon before hand. It’s all grass fed and local meats.
  • My Butcher in Duke St also stock some pretty darned nice beef
  • Eumundi has an organic butcher as well

Canberra and Australian Capital Territory

  • Coconut flour: Healthy life, Woden Westfield. IGA Deakin
  • Griffith shops has an organic butcher
  • Mountain Creek Whole Foods
  • Nut Shoppe at the Fyshwick markets good for coconut flour and oils and nuts

Melbourne and Victoria

  • Supplements and stock Wicked Whey (choc) and Naked Whey (unflavoured), which are good, clean, locally-made, grass-fed whey protein products – Great Earth
  • Kefir – Polish deli at Vic Market
  • Rendina’s Butchery in Balwyn sell a huge range of organic, bd and free range meats, including home made smallgoods (and are lovely people).
  • The Vic Market is great with loads of super fresh organic veggies, nuts and spices, and the Chicken Pantry in the shop section sells free range and some organic poultry and game. McIntosh’s sell organic coffee beans.
  • Cherry Tree Organics in Beaconsfield are butchers selling their own organic/bd lamb and beef as well as pork, chicken and smallgoods. They also have vegies and some fruit and order bath milk for anyone who likes to take milk baths. They also stock True Organic butter and cheeses.
  • I get coconut flour, flakes, and a couple of different brands of oil from Go Vita Berwick

Perth and Western Australia

  • Free range eggs – Wanneroo markets, local IGAs have Kalbarri eggs
  • Pork Crackle- there’s a local brand called Alan’s Pork Crackle, based in Maddington, you have to hunt down which local IGAs or Farmer Jacks stock them!
  • Spices, alternative flours, chia seeds etc – Wanneroo markets,
  • Coconut flour – Health Kick stores have Nui brand, can ask them to order it in
  • Coconut oil – Health Kick stores, and some Friendlies Chemists have them too!
  • Cocoa powder Green and Blacks- Health Kick stores
  • Grass Fed Beef at Subiaco’s farmers markets and frozen raw cows milk

Sydney and New South Wales

  • Grassfed beef: Hudson meats in Surry Hills is almost exclusively grassfed. Additionally, I just asked my local butcher, Michael’s Meats (very well priced, in the Surry Hills shopping village) whether his meat was grassfed and he said that almost all of it is. Additionally, Eveleigh Markets near Sydney Uni on a Saturday has a grassfed beef stall (Greenhill Organic meat).
  • grassfed beef, lamb and goat from farms in Bowral – Sydney Meats, Farm Fresh to your Door
  • Vanilla beans: Organic Vanilla Powder 30-90g – Professional Whey Protein Powder & Sports Supplements at Wholesale Prices
  • FivefingersThe Adventure Megastore – Home of Adventure in Sydney City. They are Australian priced though so cost way more than in the USA. Excellent customer service!
  • Kefir grains, coconut yoghurt and macadamia butter: About Life in Bondi junction, Sydney
  • Enoki mushrooms – paddy’s markets mushroom stand for $1.50 a bunch. Asian Thai-kee IGA above china town paddy’s markets has the same enoki for $1.90
  • Coconut/palm sugar: Thai kee IGA above paddy’s markets in Chinatown. They have all the dried seaweeds (and some fresh (frozen) too.
  • Grass fed beef etc– Slowly Does It http://slowlydoesit.com.au/
  • The Free Range Butcher, Sydney
  • the Grass Fed Butcher, Balmain markets
  • Nitrite free bacon: Sam the Butcher, Bondi Rd, Bondi.
  • Spaghetti squash: Norton St Grocer in Westfield, Bondi Junction
  • Real sauerkraut: the Russkis Deli on Bond Rd, Bondi
  • Adam’s Quality Meats in Gerringong, NSW has only grass-fed beef and lamb.

Tasmania

  • Kelty Farm – supply completely pasture fed beef. I buy mine from Eumurrah shop in Launceston.

Australian Paleo Meetup Groups

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There are Paleo meet-up groups in all states of Australia. Meetup helps groups of people with shared interests plan events and facilitates off line group meetings in various localities around the world. For example, the meet-up groups may arrange local dinners, barbecues, picnics, or talks. Meetups are a great way of meeting new people and finding out about Paleo suppliers in your area.

Here is a list of the Paleo Meetup groups in Australia:

It’s free to join up.

Interview with Scott Shoemaker, Yogurtland

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We chatted with Scott Shoemaker, Head Flavourologist of Yogurtland.

1. Tell us about Yogurtland

Yogurtland opened its first location in 2006, introducing a new approach to self service frozen yogurt – allowing customers to select from 16 premium flavors with a vast array of toppings. You may see others offer self service but all are a flattering copy of what Yogurtland started eight years ago.  Something else that sets Yogurtland apart from the rest is our own, proprietary flavours, made from real ingredients sourced from their original locations, such as Madagascar vanilla beans from Madagascar and Maqui Berry from Patagonia. No other yogurt chain offers such original flavors and exciting combinations such as Salted Caramel Pecan, Blackberry Passion Fruit, Lychee, and Dragon Passion Fruit.

2. What does a head flavourologist do?

I have an amazing staff that assists me as we search for new, innovative and cravable flavours. We have developed a philosophy here in the Product Development Department at Yogurtland which is “an empathetic pallet”. We first do a lot of investigating to understand what people expect in a flavour. For example, not everyone likes the same kind of mango, yet they each expect to find the mango that they have come to know in their lifetime in our  Yogurtland flavour. We accomplish this by blending several mangos from around the world so that our customers can find the flavour that they expect. Our goal is to “evoke an emotional response in our customers – that “aha” moment when they recognize the flavour they expect.  So my job is to manage this process, learn what our customers want, taste flavour ingredients to match those expectations and test each batch of product that is produced to make sure it meets our standards.

3. What is your most popular selling frozen yoghurt?

Our most popular flavour is different in each location. In California, Plain tart is our most popular, every-day  flavour. In other parts of the US and Australia, Dutch Chocolate, Madagascar Vanilla, and Strawberry are the most popular. We have special flavours that are also very popular, depending on the time of year – such as Chocolate Milk Shake, Salted Caramel Pecan and Strawberry Lemonade Sorbet.

4. What do you love about frozen yoghurt?

The versatility of the flavour option is great. We’ve created over 100 different flavours and we still have lots more to share with our customers. I like that we can provide our customers with a bit of indulgence and a healthier alternative that other treats – in a non-fat base and with live and active probiotics.

5. What is your favourite flavour combination?

My personal favourite is Toasted Coconut with fresh fruit. It’s one of my regular go-to servings.

6. Which frozen yoghurt is your favourite to make and to eat?

I like the nut butters with caramel. Besides Salted Caramel Pecan, we have Caramel Almond Bar and others under development.

7. What’s the biggest mistake people make when preparing dessert?

The two most common short comings are not planning ahead and the quality of ingredients. You will never get better than the quality of ingredients in the mix.

8. Best piece of cooking advice.

When I cook, I always read several recipes before I start. What I end up with is usually a combination of the different recipes. My other advice, take a chance. Mistakes are great learning opportunities.

9.  What’s your favourite cooking product?

I actually have three favourites – my spices and cheeses. I am careful to search for the most flavourful spices. Often I will create my own. I am a big fan of Latin style foods. I search for flavourful spices, never keeping them long so that they are always robust in flavour. I roast my own chili’s, never buying canned or mixes. I am famous with my friends and family for cheese blends in my cooking, even for something as simple as a grilled cheese sandwich.

10. Do you have a favourite cookbook?

I have quite an eclectic collection. I am a fan of chefs such as Thomas Keller and Rick Bayless and have several cook books from both chefs. My favourite cookbook however is the Internet. There is so much information available to all and so much creativity that is shared.

Thanks you Scott Shoemaker, Yogurtland for taking the time to talk to us.

Three ciders at the Fluid Festival

Despite the drizzly rain, we decided to spend our Saturday at the Pig and Whistle’s Fluid Festival. I tried three new exciting ciders.

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Willie Smiths Organic apple cider is made from 100% organic apples grown on the farm at Grove in the Huon Valley, Tasmania. It is Australian’s first certified organic Cidery. It had a nice cloudy and pronounced apple taste. I liked it!

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Next I tried the dcider in it’s distinctive pink labeling. The company is barely a year old and is already winning fans. It’s made with no added sugar and not from concentrate. It has a clean apple taste and is not overly sweet.

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Batlow Premium Cider is the all round good guy of ciders, with 3 and half freshly crushed batlow apples in each bottle and no added sugar. It was very drinkable and refreshing.

Overall three great new ciders to add to my favourites list.

Food travel companies in Australia

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Here are some of the food and culinary travel companies based in Australia:

How to buy sustainable seafood in Australia

A nice video showing a sustainable way to catch fish in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia
According to the “Shop Ethical” guide:
Demand for seafood has doubled over the past 30 years; three-quarters of the world’s oceans are now fished right up to their limit. Often we’re eating rare or endangered ocean species without realising it. This includes shark, commonly sold as ‘flake’ in fish and chip shops; and species such as orange roughy, bluefin tuna, swordfish, and toothfish. ‘Bycatch’ – fish caught unintentionally – often sees up to 15 tonnes of discarded fish per tonne of targeted seafood.

When buying sustainable seafood you want to ask a few questions:

  1. Buy local. Ask where it’s from and if it’s imported ask for certified sustainable seafood.
  2. Consult a seafood guide. Use the the Australia’s Sustainable Seafood Guide or app to choose a fish that has been sustainably caught and managed. For the best choice in tuna consult the Greenpeace canned tuna guide.
  3. Look for certified products from the Marine Stewardship Council (see below).

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Good swaps

If you consult your Australia’s Sustainable Seafood Guide, you’ll want to choose fish which are ranked “Green – Better choice”, such as Australian Bonito, Bream, Luderick, mullet, tailor and whiting.

Here are some of the more popular fish with their green – better choices:

  • Calamari – choose Squid, calamari, cuttlefish and octopus 
  • Crab – Blue Swimmer (Sand) crab, Mud crab
  • Mussels – Blue Mussels, also better choice is Green Mussel imported from New Zealand
  • Salmon – Imported canned salmon, predominantly Sockeye (Red) and Pink Salmon
  • Tuna – Australian Bonito, Better choice: troll or poll and line caught Albacore Tuna and Skipjack Tuna

Seafood guides

For choosing a sustainable fish consult one of the following resources:

Let’s Fight for the reef

I volunteer for the Australian Marine Conservation Society who in partnership with WWF are currently involved in promoting awareness in their Fight for the Reef campaign.

The Queensland Government is fast-tracking mega port developments, dredging and dumping of millions of tonnes of seabed and rock, and encouraging a shipping superhighway.

The Australian Government is approving these developments, including the world’s biggest coal port at Abbot Point, 50 km from the Whitsunday Islands.

Fight for the Reef is working with the Australian community to protect the Reef and the $6 billion tourism industry and 60,000 jobs it supports.

It’s your Reef, but you’re going to have to fight for it.
Fight for the Reef

The Great Barrier Reef in Queensland is on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Posted for National Volunteer Week.

Taste test: Australian Daintree tea by The Tea Centre

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The Tea Centre sells two loose leaf teas that are made from Australian tea – Australian Daintree and Australian Sencha.

We decided to taste test the Australian Daintree. It’s a pleasant mild tea which has an earthy taste. Although it is a black tea it brews to a reddish brown shade.

The tea can be taken with or without milk, or used to make iced tea. Some chefs even use it as an additive for smoking their fish and meat!

The tea is grown on the Cubbagudta (means rainy place) plantation, which is located in Northern Queensland, just north of Port Douglas. The tea is grown along the fringes of the Daintree rainforest. I was pleased to hear that the plantation does not use pesticides and so the tea contains no pesticide residues or tannic acid.

The plantation is a family owned and operated business and features in the AUSBUY guide as 100% Australian.

Don’t forget to add your tea leaves to compost as they make a great fertilizer.

A great every day tea that’s Aussie made.

Australian Daintree loose leaf tea
The Tea Centre

Produce in season for December in Australia

sprekelia-jan

Vegetables in season for December in Australia

asparagus, avocado, basil, beans, capsicum, celery, choko, cucumber, celery, choko, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, onions, peas, spring onions, squash, sweetcorn, tomato, zucchini

Fruit in season for December in Australia

apricot, banana, black currants, cherries, honey due melon, lychee, mango, orange, passionfruit, pineapple, plum, red currants, rockmelon, watermelon

Photo by Jan