Paleo orange ice blocks

orange-ice-block

Citrus and coconut water are a refreshing combination on a hot day. You could add a pinch of sea salt and have these as a replacement for those hydrating ice blocks you get at the chemist, as coconut water replaces electrolytes in the body.

Ice block moulds can be found in $2 shops or kitchen shops, otherwise use plastic cups and paddle pop sticks. You may need to double the recipe if your moulds are bigger.

1 cup of coconut water
1 cup of freshly squeezed orange juice

  1. Combine coconut water and freshly squeezed orange juice in a jug. Pour mixture into ice block moulds.
  2. Place lid on moulds and place them in the freezer for a minimum of six hours.

Makes 4 ice blocks.

Review: Natural Instinct facial products

 natural-instinct2

I have been using a couple of the Natural Instinct products for my face. They are an Australian made natural skin and hair care brand, which are formulated with botanically-derived ingredients, certified organic extracts and pure essential oils. There are no nasties in their products, so they are grey-water safe, and products are not tested on animals.

Daily mosituriser – sinks in nicely, and is not greasy like some. It smells of jojoba and rosehips, and contain B5.

Facial scrub – the right texture and is not too grainy. My face felt clean afterwards and it contains jojoba and walnut.

Foaming and cream cleanser – Both satisfying products. The foaming cleanser lathers to a light foam and is scented with lavender and rosehip. The cream cleanser is scented with jojoba and witch hazel.

Clarifying toner – left my face toned and finished. It smells citrusy and refreshing of rosewater, witch hazel and orange flower.

What I like about these products all the products are free of sulphates, petrochemicals, parabens, PEGs and mineral oils. There are also no artificial colours or fragrances.

Thank you Natural Instinct for allowing me to trial these products. 

Paleo carrot soup

Here’s a simple carrot soup for winter. It’s packed with beta-carotene, which is great for healthy skin and eyes. It’s best to make your stock from scratch so it’s packed with healing nutrients.

coconut oil
1 onion, chopped
1 clove of garlic, minced
4-6 carrots, chopped
4 cups of chicken stock + hot water
½ tsp of parsley or basil

  1. Brown the onion in some coconut oil in a pot.
  2. Boil the kettle for your stock. Add meat stock to the pot.
  3. Add the carrots, garlic and herbs. Add more hot water, if needed, to cover all the ingredients.
  4. Gently simmer until the carrots are soft, about 30 minutes.
  5. Remove from the heat and blitz well with a hand blender or food processor. Add more stock until you have the consistency you want.
  6. Season with sea salt and pepper.

Serves 2-3.

What is third wave coffee?

coffee-cup-red

So what does third wave coffee mean? Let’s back it up and explain what first wave and second wave coffee are first.

The first wave of coffee occurred with the freeze-drying techniques after the Second World War Coffee became a popular beverage, although the quality was not the best.

The second wave of coffee was the global domination of Starbucks and other chains of coffee shops, and included the trend in home espresso machines. It is characterised by a shift from Robusta to Arabica coffee beans. Coffee quality improved, although there was a rise in adding sweeteners, syrups and other ingredients to coffee to change the taste.

The third wave of coffee is treating coffee like an artesian product, similar to the way we treat a fine chocolate or wine or cheese. It is characterised by single origin coffee and being able to trace a coffee back to an individual coffee plantation. It celebrates coffee for its unique attributes and taste. Consumers are happy to pay a higher price for a better product and one which is produced sustainably and with fair trade methods.

Consumers are in an enviable position in being able to taste some of the best third wave coffee from around the world at their local and independent espresso bar.

If you are in Brisbane, you may like to attend a Bean Brewding Coffee Tour to find out more about the third wave of coffee.

Book Review: Serve to Win by Novak Djokovic

serve-to-win

Novak Djokovic reveals the gluten-free diet and fitness plan that transformed his health and pushed him to the pinnacle.

In 2011, Novak Djokovic had what sportswriters called the greatest single season ever by a professional tennis player: He won ten titles, three Grand Slams, and forty-three consecutive matches. Remarkably, less than two years earlier, this champion could barely complete a tournament. How did a player once plagued by aches, breathing difficulties, and injuries on the court suddenly become the #1 ranked tennis player in the world? The answer is astonishing: He changed what he ate.

In Serve to Win, Djokovic recounts how he survived the bombing of Belgrade, Serbia, rising from a war-torn childhood to the top tier of his sport. While Djokovic loved and craved bread and pasta, and especially the pizza at his family’s restaurant, his body simply couldn’t process wheat. Eliminating gluten—the protein found in wheat—made him feel instantly better, lighter, clearer, and quicker. As he continued to research and refine his diet, his health issues disappeared, extra pounds dropped away, and his improved physical health and mental focus allowed him to achieve his two childhood dreams: to win Wimbledon, and to become the #1 ranked tennis player in the world.

Now Djokovic has created a blueprint for remaking your body and your life in just fourteen days. With weekly menus, mindful eating tips for optimal digestion, and delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes, you’ll be well on your way to shedding extra weight and finding your way to a better you. Djokovic also offers tips for eliminating stress and simple exercises to get you revved up and moving, the very same ones he does before each match.

You don’t need to be a superstar athlete to start living and feeling better. With Serve to Win, a trimmer, stronger, healthier you is just two weeks away.

The book is mostly about nutrition and the effect of going gluten free had on his life. However Novak tells stories about how he started playing tennis, his family background, describing support he got from his family that helped him to overcome problems and become the best tennis player in the world. I was fascinated by the the background stories Novak gave about growing up in Serbia during the war and I’ll pay him more respect now for his circumstances.

There is seven day meal plan of his diet and recipes developed by Chef Candice Kumai included in the book. Novak encourages you to try the diet for just 2 weeks to see if you feel any better.

Overall it is an easy read and good introduction to the gluten-free lifestyle. It’s a must-have for fans of Novak Djokovic.

Serve to Win by Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic is a Serbian tennis player who is ranked World #1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest tennis players of all time.

The Garden Share Collective: July 2014

Garden Share Collective

I’m participating in the Garden Share Collective again this month, so here’s a round up of what has happened in our garden over the last month.

gsc-trees

Our fruit trees are growing well. Here from left to right is our black sapote (chocolate pudding) fruit tree, guava (coffee tree underneath) and our tropical apple.

gsc-tropical-apple

I’m so excited to see our first tropical apple coming along well. The citrus trees are doing much better and we have had a few limes. The macadamia is nearly up to my hip.

gsc-carrots

We’ve had a bumper crop of carrots and bulls blood beetroots. We eat the leaves of the beetroot, either steamed or roasted just like kale chips. We have also had a few of our own sweet potatoes, but they are a bit stringy for my liking.

We planted in some of our seeds from Fair Dinkum Seeds, and the garlic and marigolds have come up already. The Egyptian spinach is not doing much. The coffee plants have red beans on them, but not enough to make it worthwhile harvesting yet. We got a free basil seedling from our local library on Saturday that needs planting out.

The weather has been getting cooler, so we haven’t spent as much time in the garden as I would have liked, but everything is going well.

Coming up I’m hoping to give everything a handful of rooster booster, trace elements and seaweed solution. Things will be quiet again since winter is here.

Post for the Garden Share Collective challenge hosted by Stayed Table

Review of Queen Street Markets

qut-markets-flowers
For the last couple of weeks I have been sampling a different lunch at the Jan Powers Queen Street markets in the Brisbane City.

  • Bagel Boys – are excellent. They are always popular so you have to line up, but the time goes pretty quickly.
  • At the Skinny Scoop I had an icy cold acai classic bowl, topped with muesli and fresh fruit. It was yummy but perhaps more suited to the warmer months.
  • The Pocket from Burleigh make delicious falafel with fresh salad in a pita bread. Recommended.
  • Goetzinger Small goods make good German Sausages, but it is filling. They serve Swiss and German style sausages in a hot dog style bun.

Other produce you can buy at the city markets are as follows:

  • Goat Pie Guy - I have previously had Goat Pies from the Goat Pie Guy and I highly recommend them to take home and pop in the oven for a quick and delicious meal. Unfortunately they don’t sell them hot at the city markets.
  • Good Mix is a combination of superfoods to have instead of your regular muesli – Chia seeds, almonds, pepitas, coconut, buckwheat, flaxseed, sesame seeds, goji berries, raw cacao nibs, puffed amaranth, puffed millet.
  • Iced Tea - I’ve tried the mojito and raspberry iced tea, and both were refreshing.
  • I Heart BrowniesI tried the Jaffa flavoured brownie from I Heart Brownies. It was rich chocolaty and orange flavoured cake in the shape of a heart.
  • The Popcorn Man – is very morish, but one big bag is better shared with a group of people.
  • Delicious flavoured peanuts from the Peanut Van make a great snack.

The Queen Street markets may be crowded at lunch time, but are worth while to try some of Brisbane’s best produce.

Paleo Facebook groups

harvest-fruit

Here are some Paleo Facebook Groups and Pages you may wish to join or follow:

In My Kitchen: July 2014

Thank you Celia from Fig Jam and Lime Cordial for allowing me to participate In My Kitchen July 2014. This month, in my kitchen are …

imk-jerky

Geronimo Jerky is a Brisbane based beef jerky company that specialises in producing the best beef quality jerky. The jerky is gluten free, low in fat, low in carbs and use no artificial colourings, preservatives or additives. These three are without chilli.

griffiths-coffee

I tasted Griffiths’ Just Fair Coffee and Mundial coffee and wrote a review about it. It’s fair trade and organic in a resealable tin.

imk-cacao-nibs

I’m planning on adding cacao nibs to trail mix and muesli when I get around to it. This is the first time I’ve bought Banaban’s raw cacao nibs.

imk-paleo-hero

I’ve been enjoying Paleo Hero’s Primal Choc Granola. It reminds me of lamingtons with the cacao powder and shredded coconut. Yummy.

imk-vege-chips

These popped Vege Chips are new on the market and come in three flavours: lightly salted, lime chilli and cheese. They are a very more-ish treat.

Thank you Celia from Fig Jam and Lime Cordial for organsing In My Kitchen July 2014. Thank you Vege Chips and Griffiths Coffee for providing samples.