The Big Fat Fix – Film Review

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The Big Fat Fix is a documentary about food, health and fitness. It is independently produced by British Cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra and former international athlete Donal O’Neill.

Donal has produced two other documentaries on the low carbohydrate and high-fat diet called ‘Cereal Killers’ and ‘Run on Fat’, but this one is my favourite of all of them.

The documentary begins in the Italian town of Pioppi where we hear about the Mediterranean diet and how it has been misconstrued by the media and Dr Ancel Keys. There is no Mediterranean Diet – the Greek word ‘diaita’ actually means ‘lifestyle’.

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Dr Malhotra demonstrates clearly how inflammation impacts on the arteries and heart health. He then talks about his prescription for avoiding and turning around obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. It is possible to turn around the disease process and become more heart healthy in just 21 days.

Donal addresses functional fitness and leds Aseem through some fitness activities in a natural park with logs, rocks and trees. (He calls in tabata but it looks more like movnat to me). They talk about the benefits of vitamin D, sleep, quality olive oil, fatty acids, local produce, avoiding sugar and the re-engineering of wheat.


The Big Fat Fix is a great introduction to the low-carb, high-fat lifestyle. You can download and stream the documentary from the website.

Documenary review: Growing Change

This commodification of food by industrial agriculture has created a chasm between the grower and the  consumer. But now there’s a change. People want to close that gap in.
– Costa Georgiadis

How will the world feed itself in the future?

Is it possible to grow a fair and sustainable food system?

This film shows an experiment in how to create that change with promising solutions.

In Venezuela, from fishing villages to cocoa plantations to urban gardens, a growing social movement is showing what’s possible when communities, not corporations, start to take control of food.

Sydney filmmaker Simon Cunich went on a 12-month journey from community gardens in Sydney to farming co-operatives in Venezuela.

This documentary has a wonderful positive message. It stands there right next to the now classic Power of Community.

Highly recommended.

Growing Change

Documentary review: Forks over Knives

The “Forks over knives” dvd has just been released overseas, and I was fortunate to receive my copy on pre-order.

The documentary examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting our present menu of animal-based and processed foods.

The main storyline traces the personal journeys of Dr. T. Colin Campbell, a nutritional scientist from Cornell University, and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, a former top surgeon at the world renowned Cleveland Clinic. Inspired by remarkable discoveries in their young careers, these men conducted several groundbreaking studies. Their separate research led them to the same startling conclusion: degenerative diseases like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and even several forms of cancer, could almost always be prevented—and in many cases reversed—by  adopting a whole foods, plant-based diet.

You may have heard of Dr Campbell from his book ‘The China Study‘.

The cameras also follow some of their patients who have chronic conditions from heart disease to diabetes, and are taught by their doctors to adopt a whole foods plant-based diet as the primary approach to treat their ailments.

Keep your eye out for this one, or over your copy over at amazon Forks over Knives.